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Which wired alarm system?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 h8mmer

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 07:26 AM

After moving into a new house and being burgled almost straight away I need to beef up security on the house - first thing is a house alarm.
What with money being tight I'm going to have to go with a DIY install and I'm pretty much set on a wired system.
I've looked at the systems offered from www.diy-alarms.co.uk which are ADE, texecom and pyronix but I have no idea of their reliability etc.

Although on a budget I want to make sure I'm not installing a cheap/rubbish system. Can anyone with experience recommend a particular make?

#2 maxjones1117

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 01:32 PM

I've fitted the ADE / Accenta G3 Optima Compact panel quite a few times in domestic and small business premises, using Optex RX-40QZ(E) PIR's, Pyronix Belle sounder, Simple Set magnetic fob remote switch and Menvier SD1 Autodialer. The Informa Speech Dialer is much the same. Couple of things to remember, do not run the 12 volt DC cable near and parallel to a 240 volt AC mains cable, nearby AC can induce current in the DC cable. Do not point a PIR at a window, strong sun, even headlamps from cars, can trigger a PIR, as can heat from a nearby radiator. I find the RX-40QZ particularly resistant to heat and damp and have never had a fault. Good luck.
Max

#3 secureiam

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:25 AM

Just to add, reliability is more about correct installation than the actual manufacturer and keeping the system maintained.

Alarms should be serviced yearly, the main backup battery should be replaced every 5 years, wireless device batteries every 2 years (should help keep you relatively trouble free), they can last a little longer .If you dont check the condition of your battery its safer to replace, they can last considerably less. The lead acid back up batteries dont like being run flat.

If you live in an area that suffers from power cuts regulary then the battery is likely to last less than 5 years, but your not going to know on cheaper systems that the battery is on its last legs until a power failure and the external alarm goes off immediately. Also many people do not realise that the size of the back up battery is very important, the smaller the battery the less time it will keep the system running during a power cut.

You can work out how long a battery should last, based on the current draw of the entire system and the size of the battery,

You may be surprised that some people use very small batteries that would keep their system running for very little time in the event of a power cut.

Edited by joiner, 17 May 2014 - 09:34 AM.
Typo


#4 temp

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 11:19 PM

I know you said you wanted a wired alarm but we're very pleased with our Visonic wireless system. The "Quad" PIR sensors seem very reliable and the batteries seem to last a long time (especially if you turn off the LED on them). Not had a false alarm in 6 years. You can get key fob for it which allow the system to be armed/disarmed from outside - no need to remember pin numbers or have akey pad in the hall, just treat the house like you do your car. I have ours set up to call my mobile if the status changes. We went for the 868MHz version as the alternative is 433MHz which I think is a frequency also used for garage door openers etc. Main downside is the large number of features makes the installation manual complicated. The manual is good but there are a lot of features most people will probably never use. I think Visonic used to make the alarm system sold by BT. Not sure if BT still use them or not.

Two general comments...

If you want your system to be monitored that it will probably have to be installed by the monitoring company. I wasn't able to find anyone that will monitor a DIY installation.

I was told the police in our area do not respond to an alarm unless someone has confirmed a break in has occurred (they have too many false alarms to deal with) so I'm in the process of installing CCTV so if the alarm goes off I could look and see if there really has been a break in.




#5 Nickfromwales

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 09:08 AM

View Postsecureiam, on 17 May 2014 - 08:25 AM, said:

Just to add, reliability is more about correct installation than the actual manufacturer and keeping the system maintained.

Alarms should be serviced yearly, the main backup battery should be replaced every 5 years, wireless device batteries every 2 years (should help keep you relatively trouble free), they can last a little longer .If you dont check the condition of your battery its safer to replace, they can last considerably less. The lead acid back up batteries dont like being run flat.

If you live in an area that suffers from power cuts regulary then the battery is likely to last less than 5 years, but your not going to know on cheaper systems that the battery is on its last legs until a power failure and the external alarm goes off immediately. Also many people do not realise that the size of the back up battery is very important, the smaller the battery the less time it will keep the system running during a power cut.

You can work out how long a battery should last, based on the current draw of the entire system and the size of the battery,

You may be surprised that some people use very small batteries that would keep their system running for very little time in the event of a power cut.
Amen to all of that :-) if your regularly away from home for long periods then a big battery is a must. Also check the MaH output isn't exceeded by the alarm system components, ( calculate when in alarm condition with sounders blasting etc ), as that'll kill the power supply prematurely.
A big thing for me is to have at least one very loud internal sounder, fitted on the opposite end of the building to where the external bell box/sounder is fitted. In the event of some scrote successfully removing the external box the tamper circuit will be interupted and subsequently generate an alarm condition. If there is no additional sounder then your property will not be making any noise! Good for the scrotes, not so good for your flat screen TV.
Another good idea I had was to run switch wires from the ground floor front and rear lighting ( lobby / kitchen etc ) and connect them to relays operated by the 12- strobe output from the alarm.
If the alarm is triggered the siren sounds for a predetermined time, usually 10-15 mins max, and the strobe starts flashing to denote which house is 'under attack'. The siren will cease to sound after it times out, but the strobe contours to flash even after the alarm has been disarmed. To stop the strobe you have to press reset AFTER dissarming the alarm. If the police are on route, and you've deactivated the alarm, again this'll allow your house to be located quicker.
The relays for the lights will bring on, and keep on the house lights until the reset button has been pressed. This means you don't have to look for a light switch if the alarm goes off in the night, and also it'll make the scrotes think that someone's in if they're not. I connected another relay to my old system which powered an rcd fused spur which fed 3x 300watt halogen outside lights so the back and side of my house were lit up like a footy field if there was an alarm activation. I also set up a switch on my rear window ( using a spare pair from the 8-core alarm cable to the window contact ) which triggered those relays so swmbo could light up the rear of the property from the the upper back window if she wanted to look out as foxes kept tipping the bins over and make noises and I worked away a lot so gave her a bit of comfort to see that the 'coast was clear' at the flick of a switch.
PIR's have 'jumpers' inside to select single or double 'knock'. This is the number of times a PIR has to see movement before accepting it as an activation / alarm. If your getting false alarms, try changing this setting to 2 and retry :-)
Regards, nick.

Edited by Nickfromwales, 18 May 2014 - 09:13 AM.


#6 Ob1

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 09:27 PM

Hi

I've just upgraded the house alarm. I opted for ABUS terxon MX, with two zone extenders (one wired, the other wireless) the keypads look good and the control unit has a built in Dailer (but from experience in don't like getting a call when I'm 100s of miles from the house at 2am) so not sure I'll wire that in,

It's worth thinking about wired zone extenders, I ended up with a single comms cable into the loft which then controlled 7 zones upstairs. So they reduce wiring runs. Also look at increasing the alarm cable cores to 12 or 8 it all helps if your looking to reduce cable runs.

Ref wireless I'm not convinced, I spent a lot on the wifi extender and i haven't used it. The wifi sensors are expensive

#7 reddal

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 12:18 PM

Hi,

When I was building my house a few years ago - I tried to save some money by getting the electricians to install an alarm system rather than using a dedicated alarm company. The equipment was texecom if I remember correctly.

Anyway - it never worked properly - loads of false alarms, the autodialler didn't work, the sirens would activate inappropriately with no way to switch them off etc etc. ie it was a disaster.

In the end (about 1 year after paying for a brand new system) I paid for ADT to come in and replace everything apart from the wiring - ie every sensor, all the panels, control box, etc etc. It has worked perfectly since then. And from what ADT charged me - its clear it would have been cheaper to go that way in the first place!

Maybe I was just unlucky... One thing I would advise - be careful in your choice of PIR sensors - the super cheap kind can be a bit rubbish. Get half decent ones I would say...

- reddal