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First Quote For Groundworks....


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#1 hmpmarketing

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:07 PM

Hi guys,

Just received for groundworks for the 2 houses I plan to build (traditional or raft foundations). Im just curious if it is looks pricey or fair compared to other areas of the country. Works to be done in Littlehampton, west sussex area.

I have attached the files, would appreciate some feedback!

Thanks!

Attached Files



#2 tonyshouse

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:14 PM

Sounds like he is busy to me.

#3 jsharris

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:20 PM

The thing that jumps out at me is the cost of the raft foundation. Not sure of the areas, but an 85m² passive slab raft (including insulation, steels and concrete, power floated dead smooth) varied from £9.8K to £11K for us, and that was the passive house standards.

Some of the other costs were higher than expected, like muckaway, skips (here they are £240) providing a base for scaffold (what's that then? Our scaff guys were happy to erect on short length of boards as pads - no ground prep needed, other than it being level).

Some of the services prices are plain daft. We're in an awkward and expensive rural area and paid £380 for the electric connection and about £80 for the telecomms, we had no gas or water or drains so I can't compare those figures.

If I were you I'd shop around a bit more, perhaps giving out a tighter tender spec to pin down the prices a bit better.

Edited by jsharris, 29 April 2016 - 08:20 PM.


#4 declan52

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:22 PM

Cost of the services looks dear as its just a trench being dug with the ducts in them. Are they long runs or have you to reinstate roads or paths. Could dig a trench wide and deep enough to hold all of them in one go.
Couple of hours with a shovel and wheelbarrow would level out the hardcore for the scaffold. Hire a whacker for a day when the stone is all leveled out. Doesn't have to be like a putting green.

#5 hmpmarketing

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:28 PM

Thanks for the feedback.

I should have mentioned, big plot (20x40m) houses (2) are about 15m away from site entrance, so yea long runs I would say

Edited by hmpmarketing, 29 April 2016 - 08:29 PM.


#6 PeterW

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:29 PM

Service prices are far too high if it's just digging on your land.

Muck and skip costs look steep, moving to temp I would expect included as its done as you dig.

Foundation blockwork looks steep too

Quick check on Spon will give you a ballpark

#7 alexphd1

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:32 PM

What kind of raft foundation? I presume house footprint is 84m2?

#8 hmpmarketing

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:36 PM

 PeterW, on 29 April 2016 - 08:29 PM, said:

Service prices are far too high if it's just digging on your land.

Muck and skip costs look steep, moving to temp I would expect included as its done as you dig.

Foundation blockwork looks steep too

Quick check on Spon will give you a ballpark

Not sure what Spon is :mellow:

 alexphd1, on 29 April 2016 - 08:32 PM, said:

What kind of raft foundation? I presume house footprint is 84m2?

Not sure what kind to be honest, and yes, footprint is 84m2

#9 alexphd1

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 08:43 PM

Keep an eye on stones/hardcore spec below raft we are using 150mm 18-35mm clean stone not mot type 1 with 50mm very fine stone above the 18-35mm. We are using a KORE slab.

Edited by alexphd1, 29 April 2016 - 08:44 PM.


#10 jsharris

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 09:10 PM

 hmpmarketing, on 29 April 2016 - 08:36 PM, said:

Not sure what Spon is :mellow:

Ti's here: http://www.ebuild.co...&attach_id=2363

It's a bit out of date, but prices haven't shifted much since 2014. It's the Quantity Surveyors Bible, and universally used for pricing jobs.

#11 ProDave

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 09:30 PM

Just by way of comparison, my strip foundations cost me just a shade over £10K so again your prices look steep.

#12 Trw144

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 09:36 PM

I have two raft foundations, roughly 150m2 each and that is coming to £46k with drainage etc installed

#13 recoveringacademic

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 05:12 AM

 hmpmarketing, on 29 April 2016 - 08:36 PM, said:

Not sure what Spon is :mellow:

The current edition is much better than the 2014 edition because it separates out labour costs. In addition you get a link to an online version of the book where you can easily search for all instances of (say) hardcore. That enables you to look at prices in a variety of contexts.

The massive advantage is the ability to share the pricing information with your supplier / builder, secure in the knowledge that both parties are dealing openly and fairly. At the very least it gives a firm basis on which to start discussions.

For me, computer-phile that I am, there's nothing quite like a real book to browse and poke around in. Being able to search online as well as read the book is unbeatable.

The book gives a series of local adjustment factors, Outer London being classified as a factor of 1. Lancashire has a multiplier of 0.96 (I think). I have a feeling your area is about 1.1 ish. In addition, the book does point out that there are highly local variations - I should imagine that Sandbanks is one such area.

£150. It's saved me 10 times that in six months. And one or two trades-people haven't tried it on again once they were aware that we use SPONS as the basis for all price discussions.

For someone as green as I am to building, the book's priceless.

#14 hmpmarketing

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 06:41 AM

Morning all,

Thanks for all the responses! Have something to work with now

 jsharris, on 29 April 2016 - 09:10 PM, said:

Ti's here: http://www.ebuild.co...&attach_id=2363

It's a bit out of date, but prices haven't shifted much since 2014. It's the Quantity Surveyors Bible, and universally used for pricing jobs.

Thanks for that link Jeremy, I will take a look!

#15 temp

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 11:47 AM

Do any of the services involve digging in the road?

#16 hmpmarketing

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 02:28 PM

 temp, on 30 April 2016 - 11:47 AM, said:

Do any of the services involve digging in the road?

No digging in the road trenches would go up to the boundary

Edited by hmpmarketing, 30 April 2016 - 02:28 PM.


#17 tonyshouse

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 02:44 PM

I would buy a spade and get started.

#18 hmpmarketing

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 03:57 PM

 tonyshouse, on 30 April 2016 - 02:44 PM, said:

I would buy a spade and get started.

I wish I could, I got the time but not the experience. Ask me to build you a computer program and I will do :)

#19 joe90

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 04:43 PM

If you lived next door to me I would do it with my JCB as long as you sorted out my bloody laptop!!!! ( I hate computers with avengance, but my iPad is quite good for dummies like me :). )

#20 Garry

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 04:44 PM

 declan52, on 29 April 2016 - 08:22 PM, said:

Cost of the services looks dear as its just a trench being dug with the ducts in them. Are they long runs or have you to reinstate roads or paths. Could dig a trench wide and deep enough to hold all of them in one go.
Couple of hours with a shovel and wheelbarrow would level out the hardcore for the scaffold. Hire a whacker for a day when the stone is all leveled out. Doesn't have to be like a putting green.
I agree that was the first thing that hit me Over a grand for digging a trench and rolling out a length of alcathene Same with gas and electric