Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

Beam And Block


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Garry

Garry

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
  • LocationPreston Lancashire

Posted 27 April 2016 - 07:39 PM

I decided to use a beam and block floor to help combat the line of trees in close proximity to the house foundations I have received a quote today for supply and fit to the ground floor
I'm just looking at the quote in more detail and have noticed that this company also use polystyrene blocks in place of the concrete blocks that are normally used
I saw a similar system at the NEC but have never seen them used on site
Has anyone one here used this system?

#2 Redoctober

Redoctober

    Regular Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPip
  • 183 posts
  • LocationMilton Keynes

Posted 27 April 2016 - 07:53 PM

Hi Garry. Do we know the name of the company, as that might assist with understanding the product you are referring to. There are a few alternatives to the traditional beam and block as far as my limited understanding goes -

http://www.tetrisfloors.co.uk/
http://www.creaghcon.../spantherm.html

to name a couple - do either of these look likely?

In addition, I would be interested to hear the square metres involved and the difference in the quotes of the two options they offer.

PW.

#3 Garry

Garry

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 34 posts
  • LocationPreston Lancashire

Posted 27 April 2016 - 08:25 PM

View PostRedoctober, on 27 April 2016 - 07:53 PM, said:

Hi Garry. Do we know the name of the company, as that might assist with understanding the product you are referring to. There are a few alternatives to the traditional beam and block as far as my limited understanding goes -

http://www.tetrisfloors.co.uk/
http://www.creaghcon.../spantherm.html

to name a couple - do either of these look likely?

In addition, I would be interested to hear the square metres involved and the difference in the quotes of the two options they offer.

PW.
The company's name is CB precast
I cant remember the name of t he company I spoke to at the NEC They were a supply only company But there product looked very impressive
My ground floor is a total of 143 mtrs They have quoted £4655 Supply and fit
That's for the concrete block system
I have already sent a request for a second quote using the polystyrene blocks
Hopefully I should hear something tomorrow
With the intended underfloor heating on top it should make for a very warm floor area
Gary

#4 jamiehamy

jamiehamy

    Water Tank Conversion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 601 posts
  • LocationGourock/Largs

Posted 27 April 2016 - 10:01 PM

Question has come up a few times recently if you put in Tetris to the search. Here's one for starters :) (We used Tetris)

http://www.ebuild.co...age__hl__tetris

#5 tonyshouse

tonyshouse

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts
  • LocationThames Valley

Posted 28 April 2016 - 06:26 AM

I would take positive steps to ensure long term air tightness.

#6 vijay

vijay

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 413 posts

Posted 28 April 2016 - 07:49 AM

I'll be looking to go down the same route and wondered if it's possible to use an insulated block system to replace the standard blocks but still have the insulation as normal on top, so you get a double layer of insulation?

#7 NSS

NSS

    Regular Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPip
  • 183 posts

Posted 28 April 2016 - 12:42 PM

That's essentially what systems such as Tetris provide. We used the Hanson Jetfloor system and there are some pics on my blog which show it going down.

View Postvijay, on 28 April 2016 - 07:49 AM, said:

I'll be looking to go down the same route and wondered if it's possible to use an insulated block system to replace the standard blocks but still have the insulation as normal on top, so you get a double layer of insulation?