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Water Coming Through Footing


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Barnard01

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 11:22 AM

Hi,
I have a 1920's semi-detached house. Every time it rains the sub floor void at front of house fills with about an inch of water. I have dug down to footing outside and black jacked it, but the problem still occurs, so I'm guessing that it must be coming up through the footing inside.

The footing inside is very dirty and dusty, so my idea is to clean it up best I can and cover it with a small amount of concrete mixed with SBR so its a clean surface. Then applying a few coats of KA tanking slurry, finished of with a latex screed.

Does anyone see a problem with me doing this? Or have any other ideas?

Many Thanks,
Mike

#2 tonyshouse

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 12:04 PM

No problem, don't mess with it as it is likely ground water

Check rainwater, check water mains, check foul drains

#3 jsharris

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 12:52 PM

I'm with Tony, it's almost certainly just the water table rising through the soil under the house when it rains. It happens a lot in houses with suspended ground floors over soil, far more than people realise.

Just make sure that the under floor ventilation is good.

#4 DavidWright

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 01:25 PM

View Postjsharris, on 22 April 2016 - 12:52 PM, said:

I'm with Tony, it's almost certainly just the water table rising through the soil under the house when it rains. It happens a lot in houses with suspended ground floors over soil, far more than people realise.
As a kid in Lincolnshire in the 1960's we lived in an old house with a big cellar (brick lined, with a brick floor and kitted out for dealing with and storing meat & other produce). Several times in the 6 or so years we were there we had a foot or more of water in the cellar! It was just the local water table rising and had presumably been doing that all through the life of the house...

Edit: Add "brick lined..."

Edited by DavidWright, 22 April 2016 - 01:28 PM.


#5 Barnard01

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 02:15 PM

Thanks for replies. The adjoining house has no water at all, and we are on the same level.
It is a high water table here and I have installed extra air bricks to help with ventilation. Do you think what I have suggested about keeping water out is ok? As I really would prefer to have no water under there.

Many thanks


#6 Barney12

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 02:27 PM

View PostBarnard01, on 22 April 2016 - 02:15 PM, said:

Thanks for replies. The adjoining house has no water at all, and we are on the same level.
It is a high water table here and I have installed extra air bricks to help with ventilation. Do you think what I have suggested about keeping water out is ok? As I really would prefer to have no water under there.

Many thanks

Waterproofing the footing in the way you describe is unlikely to make any difference. Water will find its way in unless you want to try and tank the entire area which would be almost impossible. As others have said as long as everything is well ventilated you'll be fine.

EDIT: We had a 1940's semi on a steep road with a suspended floor and ours would regularly get very wet. The neighbours property (attached) was down hill from us and was always bone dry. I could never work out why but it forever annoyed me as they used the area as storage and I couldn't.

Edited by Barney12, 22 April 2016 - 02:29 PM.


#7 jsharris

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 03:27 PM

As above, short of taking the whole floor up, excavating and laying a properly watertight concrete floor, rather like a basement, you are not going to stop this.

It happens a fair bit, but people rarely notice it because the water comes and goes, so unless they have the floor up when the water table has risen and flooded the space they could go for decades being none the wiser.

#8 joe90

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 03:53 PM

If you are on a slope perhaps you could dig a French drain outside away from the footings going downhill !

#9 PeterStarck

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 04:02 PM

You could dig a hole in the front garden a few feet from the wall and see if the water in the hole is at the same depth as the water under the floor. You may have a leak in the roof drainage soil pipe next to the house.

Edited by PeterStarck, 22 April 2016 - 04:03 PM.


#10 brickie

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 07:18 PM

Is your drive paved? If so,you may be getting a run off from that too,might explain the discrepancy with next door.

#11 Barnard01

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 07:52 PM

I'm the only house with no drive in the road, I have lawn, so may be getting everyone's water is one of my thoughts?