Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

Scaffolding Height Relative To Roof


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 18 April 2016 - 07:00 AM

I'm slowly moving towards to day when we start construction of our timber frame, with this in mind I'm about to star getting scaffolding prices, according to our drawings we need approximately 80 linear metres at three different heights.

I was wondering at what height each lift should be and at what height the final lift should be in relation to the roof level?
Should the final lift be level with the gutter or set below this point, if so, how far below?

#2 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 18 April 2016 - 07:25 AM

Usually about waist height so its easier to work at when the roof truss is going on. Makes it a nice height to nail the timbers. Also at waist height it acts as a rail so you can't fall over into the house.

#3 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 18 April 2016 - 07:31 AM

I assume you are having normal scaffolding so you can't alter it?

This is what's so nice about Kwikstage or similar that's popular up here, that it's easy to adjust it. While waist height is perfect for the timber frame erection, when it comes to tiling the roof you want it higher so you can just step from the scaffold onto the roof.

#4 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:41 AM

I was thinking that Kwikstage would be best in this situation, I can see your point about the need for varying the height as work progresses.

I'm investigating the hire/erection costs, so I can compare these to the cost of buying the Kwikstage scaffold, to be sold on after the build. I have a feeling that it may be cheaper to buy rather than hire scaffolding?

Edited by Triassic, 18 April 2016 - 09:44 AM.


#5 jsharris

jsharris

    Please ignore all posts by me, some are erroneous

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 11,461 posts
  • LocationWiltshire/Dorset border

Posted 18 April 2016 - 09:59 AM

If it's any help we had to have two stage lifts during our build. The initial scaff was set with no top stage, just an intermediate stage, for the frame erection and getting the windows in (a top stage would have got in the way for the window fitters). We then had a top stage added so the eaves were at waist level for the external cladding. That top stage was then lifted to just below the eaves for the roofers. IIRC, lifts were around £200 a go.

#6 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 18 April 2016 - 11:33 AM

Inquiries with one of the companies selling second hand Kwikstage suggest 80 metres of 16 foot tall scaffold would cost £9,800 inc vat and delivery to buy.

#7 PeterW

PeterW

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 876 posts

Posted 18 April 2016 - 12:10 PM

80m...?? That seems a very long scaffold run !

I know these guys will do a deal on large amounts - Looks about £6k for 240ft plus the VAT

They also offer to buy it back at the end for 50% of the price IIRC

#8 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 18 April 2016 - 01:47 PM

View PostPeterW, on 18 April 2016 - 12:10 PM, said:

80m...?? That seems a very long scaffold run !

I know these guys will do a deal on large amounts - Looks about £6k for 240ft plus the VAT

They also offer to buy it back at the end for 50% of the price IIRC
The house is L shaped so as to fit the plot, so the perimeter measures 79.5m, yes a lot of scaffolding.

Out of interest, who are these guys? I think you may have forgotten a link?

#9 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 18 April 2016 - 02:06 PM

There are lots on ebay. A 40 ft run will typically cost £1400 from a dealer I got mine from a private seller on auction. I will have some of it for sale later in the year but nowhere near enough for your project.

Look also at Cuplock, a similar modular system that's slightly less popular but just as good.

Edited by ProDave, 18 April 2016 - 02:07 PM.


#10 vijay

vijay

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 413 posts

Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:34 PM

Is there any insurance issues with kwikstage type scaffolding systems? I assume you have to get an insured installer?

#11 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 18 April 2016 - 06:49 PM

The main thing with all types of scaffolding is it should only be erected by a qualified/competent person. Once it's erected you should get a tag signed of by who ever done the work saying it's suitable to be used.
Everyone who has ever used kwikstage will have moved bars or lifted/lowered bays themselves me included. It's just if an accident occurred and the scaffold has been altered the insurance company would walk away leaving you in the shat.

#12 PeterW

PeterW

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 876 posts

Posted 18 April 2016 - 08:28 PM

View Postdeclan52, on 18 April 2016 - 06:49 PM, said:

The main thing with all types of scaffolding is it should only be erected by a qualified/competent person. Once it's erected you should get a tag signed of by who ever done the work saying it's suitable to be used.
Everyone who has ever used kwikstage will have moved bars or lifted/lowered bays themselves me included. It's just if an accident occurred and the scaffold has been altered the insurance company would walk away leaving you in the shat.

Oddly I checked this and the kwikstage stuff is covered by your site insurance in the UK at least. If you follow the manufacturers instructions and do not modify the actual components then it's the same as ladders etc and it becomes duty of care.

This was the supplier

http://www.scaffoldi...wikstage_1.html

#13 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 23 April 2016 - 07:05 AM

So far The cheapest second hand Kwikstage (80m x 16 foot tall) I've found is £7,500 inc vat and delivery.

#14 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 23 April 2016 - 08:26 AM

Could you hire in the full amount you need to get the frame up and roof on and tiled. Then get it took away and buy enough just to do it in stages. So you buy enough to only do the longest run, maybe the front is 20m long. Put it up on the front and do whatever needs done here, take it down and move it to the back/ gable and just work your way round. That's how i done mine. I only have enough 3 bays wide and 2 full standards high or can go 6 bays wide at 1 standard height. Kwikstage is very easy to erect and move about that's what makes it so handy to use.

#15 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 23 April 2016 - 07:26 PM

About £1000 for a 10 metre run seems to be the going rate.

When I enquired about hiring scaffold, I was quoted about £2K for 4 months hire. That would have been fine if thejob was being done quickly by a builder. Mine cost £2K to buy with transport and will have been up for nearly a year by time I am ready to take it down.

Don't under estimate the work involded in taking it down and putting it back up, especially if single handed (that seems to contradict the previous post!)

Also beware a lot of kits that advertise a 10 metre run at a 6 metre platform height fir instance, only include boards for one layer to be boarded. Firstly try getting all the boards up there with nothing on lower levels to stand on. and in the real world (thinking EWI cladding and rendering) you need all lifts boarded. So like so many I have nowhere near enough boards to do it properly so am often having to move the boards around depending on what is being worked on.

#16 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 23 April 2016 - 08:03 PM

I think it's easy to take down and erect, the time consuming bit is carrying all the bars and planks to where you need to go.
Unless you are good at heights and have no issues with your balance don't try to scaffold. Until you have all the planks in and the diagonal bracing done its wobbly so be careful.
I have been using it for near 20 years so maybe my view is slightly distorted.
As Dave says no matter how many planks you buy you will still take some from other bays to do whatever you are at.

Edited by declan52, 23 April 2016 - 08:04 PM.