Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

H2 Screwdriver Bit?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 17 April 2016 - 06:55 PM

I'm starting the wood fibre cladding. I have a LOT of long screws to fit to fix it to the frame.

I'm having terrible trouble with the screws, using a P2 screwdriver bit I have to keep a lot of pressure on it to stop it jumping and chewing up the screw head. Initial thoughts are I have been lumbered with a lot of rubbish screws (they din't drive in easilly either)

But, looking at the box they come in, there's a picture of the screw and by the head it says "H2"

So the question, is there an H2 screwdriver bit that's a different profile to a P2? If so I haven't found anyone selling one yet.

Edited by ProDave, 17 April 2016 - 06:56 PM.


#2 jsharris

jsharris

    Please ignore all posts by me, some are erroneous

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 11,461 posts
  • LocationWiltshire/Dorset border

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:02 PM

H is probably a contraction of PH. I have sets of PH and PZ, with the most common being PZ2 by far, but some of the decorative stainless screws on our door hinges use PH2 screws. Recently I've been wacking in 100mm long fencing screws, and they were all PZ3's

PH (Phillips) have a more acute angle, narrower blades and tend to wrack out. Pozidriv (PZ) came about as an attempt to improve on the weaknesses of the Philips head when used with power drivers. Neither have bits that last long unless an impact driver is used, IMHO.

Edited by jsharris, 17 April 2016 - 07:02 PM.


#3 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:08 PM

That would explain why on a few I had trouble with with the drill and a P2 bit, I managed to get them home with an old Philips screwdriver.

Looks like I need a few phillips bits to try then.

Some of the long screws I have been using have torx heads. Absolutely marvelous, absolutely no tendancy to cam out.

#4 Nickfromwales

Nickfromwales

    Short cuts take three times longer.....Fact

  • Moderators
  • 8,182 posts
  • LocationSouth Wales

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:18 PM

http://www.ebay.co.u...imVUrhQfMws9Byw

I use these, and nothing else comes within a mile of them. Get some of those and you'll see the difference immediately. When new they bite so well you have to get the bit back out of the screw head sometimes as the magnetic holder isn't good enough to free it :)
They're the mutts nuts ;) buying bigger packs works out cheaper :)
Regards, nick.

Edited by Nickfromwales, 17 April 2016 - 07:19 PM.


#5 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:21 PM

plaster board screws are usually PH2, you also usually get a couple free bits in a decent sized box if you have any lying around

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 17 April 2016 - 07:22 PM.


#6 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:25 PM

Thanks Nick, I'll buy some of them and try them and report back.

#7 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:31 PM

Attached File  23954759-hex-screwdriver-bit--size-h2.jpg   5.88K   21 downloads
:ph34r:

#8 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:41 PM

*
POPULAR

I think I would have noticed that.

#9 Nickfromwales

Nickfromwales

    Short cuts take three times longer.....Fact

  • Moderators
  • 8,182 posts
  • LocationSouth Wales

Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:45 PM

View PostProDave, on 17 April 2016 - 07:25 PM, said:

Thanks Nick, I'll buy some of them and try them and report back.
I use the pz2's daily and I've tried Milwaukee, Dewalt, and all the others off eBay when they pop up cheap, but those ones are all mothballed in my screw boxes now, just for when I run out of the wiha's. Fwiw, I buy them in boxes of 50 for £25 from my local tool supplier.
Punch your postcode in and see if the P&P is tolerable.
http://www.cnspowert...9-102-7247.html
:)

#10 cjard

cjard

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 292 posts

Posted 17 April 2016 - 08:18 PM

View Postjsharris, on 17 April 2016 - 07:02 PM, said:

PH (Phillips) have a more acute angle, narrower blades and tend to wrack out. Pozidriv (PZ) came about as an attempt to improve on the weaknesses of the Philips head when used with power drivers. Neither have bits that last long unless an impact driver is used, IMHO.

If by wrack out you mean "cam out" then it's intentional. Philips screws are designed to be used in industrial processes and are usually fitted by machines. The requirement of the bit and screw head to separate easily when a required torque is met is essential to a dumb device like a mechanical screw driver not wrecking the screw, work or both.

In the context where we use them: plasterboard, decking and other large expanses where thousands of screws are driven Philips heads are used for the same reasons. Your life gets a lot easier when you buy a collated screw gun and fit your plasterboards with it. 2000 screws in an hour, each one perfectly sunk to the level of the board is a lo better than fumbling round with an impact driver and tub of screws, even if it does have a deph stop

Philips and pozidriv screws should always be used with their respective bits.. There's a massive difference between the two ("it's not just "a plus shaped driver is for screws with a plus on the head") and using one with the other is the fastest way to a wrecked bit, or wrecked screw. Most my pz2 bits have failed through snapping the vanes off (with an impact driver- usually because it was set to the wrong direction and it's a lot harder to tell than with a normal cordless, or that with being used for screw in as well as out, the different directions introduce stresses that break them) or when it's just got too worn and become prone to skipping. The ph2 bits I have still look near new, and I'm 9000 screws in to one of them (the other just sinks the odd plasterboard screw that the gun leaves proud). That's not to say it's better; their duty is a lot lighter than what I ask the pz2 and 3 to do.. But I dare say it's not real possible to equate the two or say one is worse than the other, they're just different

#11 Nickfromwales

Nickfromwales

    Short cuts take three times longer.....Fact

  • Moderators
  • 8,182 posts
  • LocationSouth Wales

Posted 17 April 2016 - 09:03 PM

View Postjsharris, on 17 April 2016 - 07:02 PM, said:

H is probably a contraction of PH. I have sets of PH and PZ, with the most common being PZ2 by far, but some of the decorative stainless screws on our door hinges use PH2 screws. Recently I've been wacking in 100mm long fencing screws, and they were all PZ3's

PH (Phillips) have a more acute angle, narrower blades and tend to wrack out. Pozidriv (PZ) came about as an attempt to improve on the weaknesses of the Philips head when used with power drivers. Neither have bits that last long unless an impact driver is used, IMHO.
It wasn't for a good while after owning an impact for the first time, that I realised why I was literally going through a half dozen bits a day. The impact needs impact rated bits, and I was still using the regular Dewalt pz2's I'd used previously in my combi drill / driver, oops !
After trying a load of various bits, and paying too bloody much for them, I was given a wiha bit at my merchants to try out. Eureka :)
If the comparison for 'better or worse' is against makes of bits rather than their duty, then there are some really carp, branded bits out there which are complete pants. Thats a fact.
Good chat, this :)
Regards, nick.

#12 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 17 April 2016 - 09:32 PM

Always liked wera bits. Last along time unless the wife/dad uses my cordless.
Cheap bits are a false economy. 20 bits for a £5 made from a stiff tinfoil alloy or one hardened bit for a £5. Learnt that lesson long ago. Will have to give the wiha gear a go.

#13 Nickfromwales

Nickfromwales

    Short cuts take three times longer.....Fact

  • Moderators
  • 8,182 posts
  • LocationSouth Wales

Posted 17 April 2016 - 10:03 PM

Wera are very good too, just a bit too expensive and I couldn't see where the difference was in quality vs wiha, so 100% worth a punt.
B)

#14 stones

stones

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  • LocationOrkney

Posted 17 April 2016 - 10:21 PM

View PostProDave, on 17 April 2016 - 07:08 PM, said:


Some of the long screws I have been using have torx heads. Absolutely marvelous, absolutely no tendancy to cam out.

Fantastic screws aren't they? I use them wherever I can get away with them for that very reason. Good range of sizes available as well. I get mine from Toolstation. Is it too late for you to switch screw type?