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ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

Madam Not Chuffed!


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#1 Onoff

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 02:08 PM

In the process of recovering/getting this back home at the moment:

Posted Image


Bathroom, what bathroom?

:lol:

#2 vijay

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 02:18 PM

Somethings are more important than a house!! :)

#3 Nickfromwales

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 02:39 PM

Has it got the obligatory "Trevor & Sharon" sticker at the top of the windscreen? :P
:D

#4 joiner

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 03:04 PM

Good cars as long as they're not fitted with Michelins.

Had a fabulous 1.6 GT XLR, metallic bronze, tan leather seats.

I'd gone up to a local car auctions with a mate (Nigel) who dealt in second hand motors and drove it back for him (I used to tune and service his rally Mini, so we got on really well). He got it cheap because everyone we saw looking at it walked away shaking their head, talking about what a shame it was that a car with such an immaculate body was so rotten underneath. We looked and sure enough it did look rough as hell but we reckoned that if he got it at the right price it could be fixed. He got it for £700 which was way below what we'd reckoned it was worth. When we got back I said how much I liked it and would he give me first refusal on it. No problem.

The next day I got a call to go and see him pronto. He was grinning from ear to ear and had the car on the lift. The "rotten" underside was the underbody sealant peeling off, the metal was shiny bright. This was in 1981 and we'd reckoned it was worth "at least fifteen hundred quid of anybody's money". I offered him £900 straight away and he gave me a funny look. "A grand?" Done, quickest and easiest profit he'd ever turned.

I fitted new Michelins all round and within a week had lost it on an acute bend doing a crawl because it was mid-summer, it had just rained, and the road at that point was a known accident black spot because of the rubber scrub-off from lorries. It was like being on ice and happened so quick, one second I was sliding sideways on the road, the next the car had found traction and shot forward, hit and mounted the kerb and the front of the car had lifted and come down on the low wall of the pub on that corner, the protruding bonnet of the Capri had crumpled.

Nigel came and recovering me on the trailer and we took it back to the workshop. The insurance assessor came out two days later, took one look at the car and said: "Michelins?" All round. "There you go then, fit Firestones." He asked me if I'd like a Mk2 bonnet (with the bulge) and OK'd the repairs because he "loved Capris".

The Firestones transformed the handling.

So look after it! ;)

Edited by joiner, 16 April 2016 - 03:05 PM.


#5 SteamyTea

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 03:22 PM

https://www.howmanyl...?utf8=✓&q=capri

Not a Lazer is it?

Edited by SteamyTea, 16 April 2016 - 03:23 PM.


#6 ProDave

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 03:46 PM

Been there, done that, got it out of my system.

While I enjoyed driving it, it was a most impractical car. On a camping trip to cornwall, I had an accident in Newquay. A car coming the other way, looking for somehwere to park aparently, turned across in front of me. I hit him side on and the momentum of his car moving pushed the whole front end sideways. No RAC membership then so the car had the be left in Newquay and I came home on the train.

Much to my surprise it wasn't a write off. It was straighrtened out, one new wing, new front end, new bonnet and front end re sprayed so well you could not tell which bits had been re sprayed and which bits not. Got the train back a few weeks later to collect it.

That was when I decided I wanted something that would carry more stuff and cope with rough tracks and wet campsites better (on that trip I had grounded the bottom of the Capri several times exploring remote places) so I bought my first Landrover. Ran the LR and the Capri for a year before deciding I really could not afford 2 cars, after another year with the LR as my only car I sold that and bought a Range Rover (original classic RR) Fantastic car to drive, drank fuel like it was going out of fashion, keept needing bits replacing.

Then i found Subaru's. 4 wheel drive, better ground clearance than an ordinary car, great towcars, Japanese reliability and normal car cost of ownership. never looked back since. My present LR is just my hobby car.

Re handling, we reckioned you needed to keep a couple of bags of cement in the boot of a Capri to hold it down.

Edited by ProDave, 16 April 2016 - 03:48 PM.


#7 jsharris

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 03:55 PM

I had a Capri once. I'd taken my Clan Crusader (semi-race car really) off the road and a "mate" said I could buy his white Capri 3000 GT for £400, to keep me on the road. I'm not a Capri person, it has to be said, and sadly the 3000 GT only worsened my opinion of the car. It would switch, totally unpredictably, from gross power oversteer to suicidal understeer at any attempt to change direction. It came close to killing me more times than I can remember, and it's only saving grace was it's ability to do a U turn in even the narrowest of lanes, by virtue with the ease with which both rear wheels would lose traction in clouds of tyre smoke when given a bit of wellie.

I drove it for a winter, whilst re-building the Clan for the next season's hill climbs and sprints, then sold the Capri to another friend who desperately wanted it, despite my telling him that it handled like a bollock on roller skates. I was happy to go back to driving a car that really did handle properly, even if it did only have 122 bhp............

Posted Image

Edited by jsharris, 16 April 2016 - 03:56 PM.


#8 stones

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 03:56 PM

View PostNickfromwales, on 16 April 2016 - 02:39 PM, said:

Has it got the obligatory "Trevor & Sharon" sticker at the top of the windscreen? :P
:D

Furry dice hanging from the rear view mirror?

#9 Triassic

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 05:03 PM

You've got to remember that this is fast becoming a classic and prices are rising for good examples.

It's a valuable asset, not a liability!

#10 ProDave

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 05:06 PM

That's what I say about my Landrover.

#11 Onoff

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 05:57 PM

The car in the picture above is a 1983 1.6 Cabaret. The Capri ceased production in 1987 with the 280 Brooklands. In the run up to this and pre them streamlining the range Ford basically had a number of body shells and other components to "shift" so they went through a period of producing a number of "all show and no go" models such as the Cabaret, Calypso, Cameo and GT4. Sometimes with two tone paint and go faster stripes! This cabaret has two tone metallic paint, the 6 dial dash, tinted glass, rear spoiler and rear wash wipe along with body side mouldings.....all driven by a 1.6 with Ford's own carb! (It's getting a Weber).

Near the end you had the 1.6 & 2.0 Lasers.

I believe there is only one other Cabaret still on the road.

As for values; the silver 3.0S used by Bodie in The Professionals went a couple of years back for circa £22K. It's been up for auction again recently at Duxford with a £38-45K starting figure. A rally Capri went recently for over £90K.

I couldn't care less about them being tail happy tbh it's all part of the charm and besides there are modern tweaks to improve this. There is a very interesting, factory looking conversion whereby a Sierra 4x4 floor pan along with the inner wings has been grafted to a Capri. Of course the first 4WD was back in the 70's with the Ford Ferguson rally cars.

Had all the wheels off and had the tyres (circa 1981) tubed just for moving it around. Freed up the front and rear so all the wheels are turning. Just got to sort the ignition barrel that won't turn (not sure if the key is correct tbh). I'll snap the barrel bolts off and remove it if necessary as steering is a must to get it down the long narrow drive and onto the transporter. Back at mine next weekend hopefully!

Edited by Onoff, 16 April 2016 - 05:58 PM.


#12 ProDave

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 06:58 PM

Mine was a Mk 2 1.6 GL It looked nice with metalic blue paint work, vinyly roof, sun roof, and (added by PO) allow wheels, but had little grunt. Trouble was when you were young you might want the 3.0S but insurance costs drove you to the 1.6 A mate of mine even had a Mk1 1.3 (the Mk1 had a boot instead of a hatchback)

One of the shocking things I recall about engines of that era were at about 60K miles you needed a new camshaft as the cam lobes were wearing away. Compare that to a modern engine, my Subaru has done 150K (barely run in) and has never had anything other than oil. filer and spark plugs, and a new timing belt.

One of my "fond" memories was fitting a better radio. I spent the best part of a day taking the dash apart and fitting the new radio. It all seemed to work. Then I put it all back together. Great job. Then I went out for a drive. As the engine speed increased, so did the speed of the tape player. I had to take it all apart agian and return the radio for an exchange. I recall driving to the shop with half the innards of the car missing to achieve that!!!.

Edited by joiner, 16 April 2016 - 08:52 PM.


#13 Onoff

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 08:42 PM

All four wheels back on and the wheels free and turning after liberal application of some brute force! Off the stands. Couldn't for the life of me find the key to turn the ignition, either that or there's something seized. So.....some deft tapping round with a long sharp screwdriver and hammer saw the ignition barrel bolts unscrewed.

We are rolling & have steering! Posted Image

Been in touch with a nice man at Anyvan at Horsham (after finding my local branch had closed down). Fingers crossed to move it next Saturday! Pics of the full "horror" of what lies beneath in due course!

Thoroughly enjoyed my day off yesterday and the couple of hours there today. BUT.....got to spend all day tomorrow on the bathroom.

Edited by joiner, 16 April 2016 - 08:52 PM.
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#14 SteamyTea

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 08:48 PM

I was looking for somewhere to park in Newquay, and this emmet, with a Capri full of camping gear, drove into the side of me. Thankfully it was not a Landrover :D

#15 joiner

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 08:56 PM

60K, Dave? The recommended interval for a 'de-coke' was 30K. If you got 60K out of a set of crank bearings you were lucky.

And "piston slap"?

A "knocking engine"?

And who worried about "a bit of an oil leak"?

#16 ProDave

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 09:26 PM

View Postjoiner, on 16 April 2016 - 08:56 PM, said:

And who worried about "a bit of an oil leak"?
Nobody that owns a Landrover that's for sure.

I once saw one advertised as "leaks oil from all the right places" And I upset a guy at a car show with a Series 1 Landrover that without a doubt was in better condition at the show than the day if left Solihul. I commented that there were no aparent oil leaks and for some reason he thought I was being cheeky.

#17 jsharris

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 09:30 PM

That bit of red, 1960's engine technology powering me up Tregrehan Hillclimb, is revving at around 10,500 to 11,000 rpm in that photo, in second gear. The fastest bit of the hill is just beyond that bend and would have been around 12,500 rpm, still in second.

That engine (a 998cc Hartwell, with no head gasket, Wills rings, an R22 cam and twin 40 Dellorto's) never leaked oil, barely needed any work between events and always ran as smooth as a sewing machine. It was just clutches, gearboxes and drive shafts that never lasted long.

#18 Onoff

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 09:44 PM

Talking of hill climbing Steve McQueen used to do it just down the road from me (literally) in the 1950s albeit on a motorbike.

#19 Onoff

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 11:58 PM

View Postjoiner, on 16 April 2016 - 03:04 PM, said:

"Good cars as long as they're not fitted with Michelins"

"The Firestones transformed the handling"

I also have a 2.0S MK3 in the garage and this one will sit next to it.

As well as.....my FIRST ever car, a 1976 MK2 2.0GL. Back in the day Firestones were my tyre of choice and I'd spend ages painting the "FIRESTONE" in white!

The S is little more than an engine-less shell and the MK2 GL sadly beyond repair. Plan is to restore the Cabaret to near factory maybe with a Zetec transplant for more power. the S shell will become something much more to personal taste. Parts of the MK2 will live on in this though.

OK I like Capris! :lol:

#20 Nickfromwales

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Posted 17 April 2016 - 07:44 AM

Posted Image

I like new things.
:D