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Took The "plunge" (Saw)


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#1 Barney12

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 05:45 PM

Now let's be honest; like most on here I do love any excuse to buy any tool, especially a power tool :)

But I have to say my latest purchase has genuinely got me quite excited :D

A Bosch plunge saw and guide rail set. This one:

http://www.bosch-pro...ce-27298-ocs-p/

I've got a Bosch circular saw but that is definitely destined for EvilBay!

Ripping down large sheets is a dream and incredibly accurate as is setting the depth which is child's play and mm accurate.

Don't buy one without the guide rails. It's that which makes it a great tool.

#2 ProDave

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 05:50 PM

Okay, enlighten me. Apart from the guide rails, what makes that different to any other circular saw? I can set the depth on mine, I can plunge cut with mine, and it cost 1/10 the cost of yours.

Does yours have a laser line projected in front of it to guide you to your cut?

I uses to use it for cutting traps in floor boards, but more often I use the multi tool for that now. (didn't used to have the multitool then)

Edited by ProDave, 12 April 2016 - 05:50 PM.


#3 jsharris

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 05:56 PM

The main difference, I think, is that you can set the depth and have the blade above the surface, then plunge into in from the vertical. None of my circular saws allow that, as the blade guard gets in the way. You end up having to use the saw with one hand on the handle and the other on the manual blade guard retract, which on both of the saws I have now, and the one that blew up a year or so ago, was a bit of a pain.

Edited by jsharris, 12 April 2016 - 05:57 PM.


#4 Barney12

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 05:59 PM

Well maybe your circular saw is just a whole lot better than my years old model!

The plunge is incredibly controllable as the plate is already flat to the surface.

The depth is controlled from the top using a very neat system, you effectively just 'dial in' from the mm scale. (I don't think I've explained that very well).

The rail is super accurate as you can "toe" the plunge plate to the rail. It's also incredibly sturdy and a more than useful 3.2m long.

Hey, I'm trying to justify buying a new tool. I really don't need to, it's a new tool. Period! :D


#5 ProDave

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 06:00 PM

Yes I know you have to hold the guard open manually but I have used mine like that many times to plunge cut to cut a trap in a chipboard floor, with the depth set so it will only just cut through.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not putting down your new purchase, just trying to understand it's benefit. It's a bit like why would I pay 3 times as much for a Fein multitool, when my no name one does pretty much the same, and if it breaks I can buy another 2 for the same price.

I guess I have just been lucky with the no name stuff I still can't believe how good and reliable my SDS drill is, and it cost me about £30 13 years ago and has had a hard life since but just keeps going (new longer mains flex fitted and one replacement pair of motor brushes)

Edited by ProDave, 12 April 2016 - 06:05 PM.


#6 Barney12

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 06:00 PM

View Postjsharris, on 12 April 2016 - 05:56 PM, said:

The main difference, I think, is that you can set the depth and have the blade above the surface, then plunge into in from the vertical. None of my circular saws allow that, as the blade guard gets in the way. You end up having to use the saw with one hand on the handle and the other on the manual blade guard retract, which on both of the saws I have now, and the one that blew up a year or so ago, was a bit of a pain.

Yes exactly that and in my view that's pretty dangerous too!

#7 Barney12

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 06:02 PM

There is a review here if you're interested:

http://www.bosch-pro...rofessional.pdf

#8 mrpunter

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 06:19 PM

I have the Makita SP6000. It lets you cut very near the edge of floors etc and easily attach a vacuum.

#9 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 12 April 2016 - 07:05 PM

i found it was the rail that makes the difference, But you can get adaptor plates to fit standard circular saws ( i got one for my big makita)

i have used both and although the plunge saw is VERY nice to use, I couldn't see the massive mark up either. hence me buying the £40 adapter plate but then again i did already have the big saw. decisions decisions.........

If it was going to be my only saw I would seriously consider a package like Barnies

about 2:30 for a quick look at the plate.
https://www.youtube....h?v=6k_Be-CgUiM

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 12 April 2016 - 07:09 PM.


#10 Nickfromwales

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 08:24 AM

With a regular circular you have to plunge cut by moving forward as you plunge, due to the knife ( blade guard ) stopping the plunge action at a standstill.
I have a plunge saw on the list of goodies to get next as I'm fitting more and more kitchens and the full height and short decor end panels etc would be much easier to cut with one. I'm planing them down at the mo after a rough cut with the 18v makita circular saw. :(
The blade ont the plunge saw is deliberately very fine, as that's the work it's intended for, so utterly pointless comparing it to a regular circular. When I get one, for instance, I would never dream of using it for floorboards etc so would still keep my handheld circulars for the jobs theyre intended for ;).
One good use will be for troughing out as the depth can be maintained exactly for each pass.
And yes, it's a tool, so the purchase is fully justified. What my wife spends on hair a year is my tool budget !
Regards, Nick.

Edit : poxy iPhone spell changes!!!

Edited by Nickfromwales, 13 April 2016 - 09:52 AM.


#11 DavidWright

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 08:41 AM

The local guy who is the one everyone wants to use if he has the time to fit in their kitchen, bathroom, custom joinery, etc., job rates his DeWalt plunge saw (& guide rails of course) as his best/favourite tool (& he has lots) because of the accuracy and controllability.

#12 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 05:00 PM

View PostNickfromwales, on 13 April 2016 - 08:24 AM, said:

With a regular circular you have to plunge cut by moving forward as you plunge, due to the knife ( blade guard ) stopping the plunge action at a standstill.
I have a plunge saw on the list of goodies to get next as I'm fitting more and more kitchens and the full height and short decor end panels etc would be much easier to cut with one. I'm planing them down at the mo after a rough cut with the 18v makita circular saw. :(
The blade ont the plunge saw is deliberately very fine, as that's the work it's intended for, so utterly pointless comparing it to a regular circular. When I get one, for instance, I would never dream of using it for floorboards etc so would still keep my handheld circulars for the jobs theyre intended for ;).
One good use will be for troughing out as the depth can be maintained exactly for each pass.
And yes, it's a tool, so the purchase is fully justified. What my wife spends on hair a year is my tool budget !
Regards, Nick.

Edit : poxy iPhone spell changes!!!

gonna have to disagree there but only on a couple of points,
1) the riving knife would get in the way of plunging if it was still on the saw. and i wouldn't advise anyone to remove it but lets just say its not on mine anymore.
2 ) you can get the same blade to fit almost any saw, although the plunge saws come with a higher tooth count there is nothing stopping you getting the same blade for a normal skill saw.

what really does make the difference is the "splinter guard" on the rail and the fact the rails seem to stick so well to most non dusty surfaces.
the splinter guard means you can cut most laminates from the top as long as the rail is on the good bit and it really does do what it says on the tin. great for cutting out sinks and so on in situ.

i will also agree they are also fantastic for setting to a depth, although for some reason the makita version doesnt take into account the rail so you have to add 3mm, swings and roundabouts i suppose,

all in all i think it was a great purchase, running on a rail really is a game changer when it comes to actually cutting straight, and i do mean really straight,

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 13 April 2016 - 05:01 PM.


#13 joe90

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 05:30 PM

I have a clamp on long straight edge that I have been using for years to cut straight lines with my standard circular saw, also ( against common sense ) I have removed the riving knife to do plunge cuts in the past.

#14 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 05:57 PM

that is the way i had been doing it, and TBH still do because my big saw with the adaptor plate is just a hassle and is normally kept at home and Stu's actual plunge saw is 110 so i really have to be doing multiple cuts before i start lugging a transformer around,
but saying that i assume you haven't had a go with a saw on a rail??? plunger or not,..... its the way it sticks, just mark each end slap the rail down and cut it and it is dead straight,

saying that i wonder if i stuck some of the rail tape to one side of my level it would stick as well?

#15 jsharris

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 05:57 PM

My Makita came without a riving knife and I haven't noticed any tendency for the cut to close up and squeeze the blade without it. Makes me wonder why I kept the knife on my old saw, as it was often a bit of a nuisance.

I like the idea of the long rail, even though I have a long aluminium alloy clamp-on straight edge I've used for years. It's always a bit of a faff holding the saw plate tight up to the straight edge, so a rail sounds very attractive. The problem is I need to cut down some of the left-over larch into even-width planks (it's waney edge boards, with just one sawn edge at the moment) so this gives me the excuse to buy a rail, except I probably won't use it again for ages........................

#16 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:10 PM

View Postjsharris, on 13 April 2016 - 05:57 PM, said:

My Makita came without a riving knife and I haven't noticed any tendency for the cut to close up and squeeze the blade without it. Makes me wonder why I kept the knife on my old saw, as it was often a bit of a nuisance.

I like the idea of the long rail, even though I have a long aluminium alloy clamp-on straight edge I've used for years. It's always a bit of a faff holding the saw plate tight up to the straight edge, so a rail sounds very attractive. The problem is I need to cut down some of the left-over larch into even-width planks (it's waney edge boards, with just one sawn edge at the moment) so this gives me the excuse to buy a rail, except I probably won't use it again for ages........................

only time i have noticed the lack of knife being an issue is on warped sheets of ply or OSB, or thin sheets like 3mm ply where the waste drops and falls into the trailing teeth. otherwise as you say its just not an issue.

the only other issue i found with a plunge saw as an all rounder is that they don't cut overly deep. their not meant for that so i understand but it was another reason for me to get the adaptor plate over a whole new saw. i think mine will still cut about 80mm +-a bit

you really won't regret investing in a rail system "plunge" or otherwise. just have a go at a sheet of melamine. or like Nick said an end panel and look at the quality of the top cut........really was a game changer for me :)

the other added bonus is you put the rail to the actual cut line, not 38mm back (or whatever the offset is between the side of the blade you want and the edge of your plate

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 13 April 2016 - 06:38 PM.


#17 Barney12

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:35 PM

View PostConstructionChannel, on 13 April 2016 - 05:57 PM, said:

saying that i wonder if i stuck some of the rail tape to one side of my level it would stick as well?

I'm liking that idea. The number of times you've got a long level on a wall/board and just as you're about to run the pencil the *!*!*!*!* thing slips!

6m of the Bosch tape here for not too much money:

https://www.ebay.co....tm/311555279428

Edit: would make a good video how to tip!

Edited by Barney12, 13 April 2016 - 06:35 PM.


#18 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:47 PM

View PostBarney12, on 13 April 2016 - 06:35 PM, said:

I'm liking that idea. The number of times you've got a long level on a wall/board and just as you're about to run the pencil the *!*!*!*!* thing slips!

6m of the Bosch tape here for not too much money:

https://www.ebay.co....tm/311555279428

Edit: would make a good video how to tip!

and done
Attached File  Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 19.46.48.png   26.6K   12 downloads

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 13 April 2016 - 06:48 PM.


#19 recoveringacademic

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 07:11 PM

View PostNickfromwales, on 13 April 2016 - 08:24 AM, said:

What my wife spends on hair a year is my tool budget !


Well, that for me would mean I could afford a screw-driver. Easy care is our Deb.

#20 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 07:16 PM

http://www.ebay.co.u...iUAAOxycmBS3SJn

what about this one???