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Farmhouse Resoration In Herefordshire


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#1 jonathon916

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 06:16 PM

Hi just starting to restore a large farmhouse in Herefordshire. The property is 14th century in it's oldest part, a further part is 16th century and the front an and side wing is from the Victorian era.
The house will be restored using traditional methods of construction, lime plasters and oak framing with oak windows.If the budget stretches that far!!!!.
Look forward to your feedback. Jonathon

#2 Mackers

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 06:50 PM

Sounds like a nice project. Start a blog, I love old buildings.

You'll get plenty of practical help and advice here, run your plans by us all as many hands make light work. Always someone with an idea to make things better or a contact to help you out.

#3 Trw144

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:07 PM

Hi,

I m also about two start a new build in Hereford. Where abouts are you?

Tom

#4 jonathon916

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:09 PM

Thank you.
First investigations by me! have found some rotten sections in the oak frame (to be expected). Many of the windows are beyond repair, water damage from leaking gutters or no gutter at all!, but the roof is good and water tight apart from a leak over a dormer window. Most of the damage is either age related or caused by wallies using modern non breathable materials on an old building. Expect me to be asking lots of questions.

#5 jonathon916

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:12 PM

Hi Tom, just outside Malvern on the Herefordshire Worcestershire boarder. How about you?. Are you doing the work yourself? any experience?. Jonathon

#6 Trw144

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:15 PM

Hi

I n project managing and bits and pieces where I feel my skill set is good enough. I m building at Bartestree but work in Bishops Frome so not far from you. I m building an ultra modern flat roof place so at the opposite end of the spectrum to your farmhouse renovation!

Edited by Trw144, 24 March 2016 - 07:15 PM.


#7 jonathon916

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 07:46 PM

Good luck with your project. I am looking for a good method of heating a large area, 3,500sq ft plus, so am planning on using plenty of breathable insulation, natural sheeps wool type, so much better than the modern fiberglass stuff, smells good too. We have no mains water but the properties close by have this, we have a well supply but tests have shown it undrinkable at present. No mains gas or sewer but these things are the norm in the villages of Herefordshire.

#8 Trw144

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 08:02 PM

How insulated and air tight do you think you can make it?

#9 jonathon916

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 08:17 PM

With oak windows and plenty of natural insulation in the frame walls and roof space it should be reasonable. With buildings of this age they must be allowed to breath by using natural products, so there is a big list of things you should never use, but breathable should not mean cold. Wood wool and lime based products can retain plenty of heat if kept dry and aired.

#10 Roger440

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 10:11 PM

Pictures! We need pictures.

#11 joiner

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 10:19 PM

http://www.womersleys.co.uk/

#12 jonathon916

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:21 PM

I will take some pictures over the weekend, look forward to all your comments.

#13 Mackers

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:55 PM

Pictures and a blog, we demand it lol

#14 jsharris

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:51 PM

Don't confuse "breathable" with lack of airtightness, as they are two totally different things, and often a bit of draught is seen as a "good thing" in older buildings, when the reality is that it can cause problems as well as increase heat loss. What we lost, somewhere along the way, was the old tradition of building houses with properly graded vapour permeability. Instead of doing things the way they should be, with a vapour impermeable inner skin and every part of the structure from the inside out being made more vapour permeable, we seem to have seriously messed things up about the time we started to render the outside of houses with virtually vapour impermeable cement-based materials.

There's nothing wrong with (in fact there's a lot to be said for) using vapour impermeable materials on the inner layer of the house, but there are big problems caused by using them outside, where vapour can get trapped inside the structure and condense onto structural parts that may be subject to damp-induced rot. The reason that embedded joist ends rot is that they end up cold, and moisture condenses on them and can't escape, leading to ideal conditions for moulds, rot and wood boring insects to thrive.

There are alternative insulation materials available too, that are well-worth looking at. Sheeps wool is expensive, and not without some problems in the long term, when the oils and lanolin evaporate out, plus it has to be contained within an effective insect barrier (unless you use something nasty to treat it with). Cellulose insulation is available is several different types, from wood fibre bats through to wet-sprayed or dry pumped cellulose from shredded paper. None of the cellulose based products have anything nasty in them, and all are pretty vapour permeable. They also tend to have a fairly high decrement delay factor, which can be useful in trying to better regulate temperatures between warm days and cool nights.

Some of your biggest challenges are going to be trying to improve the energy efficiency to whatever standard may be required, as I'm assuming from the scale of the project that the work is of a nature that's going to need building control approval. Although the energy saving measures for renovations are lower than for new buildings, you can renovate using "natural" materials to a fairly good energy efficiency standard. Doing this can also reduce some of the factors that cause degradation in older buildings, especially timber framed ones where cold bridging and the consequent creation of condensation loci can be a significant reason for timber rot.

#15 jonathon916

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 08:25 PM

Yes I agree with what your saying. I am trying as far as possible to do the work myself, the budget is very low at the moment you could say almost nil! but this situation will improve. The timber frame being over 600 hundred years old will need some attention, in places it has been the focus of some ill informed builder! with his concrete, Portland cement and mastic gun, some people just have no idea what there doing. I am going to examine the frame and lay bare the areas which need full or partial replacement. The idea here is if I do employ a framer he is able to see what needs doing and crack on!. Also no phone calls saying 'you better come down and see what we have found' and double the original quote!.
I will need to contact building control at some stage. The focus of my attention this next week as well as the bay windows will be the two cellars, get some air flowing through them and start the drying out process.
I will take some pictures so you can see what I'm rambling on about.

#16 jonathon916

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 10:58 AM

Just a couple of things I would like advice with please. The one side of the house was connected to an adjacent barn, the connecting building which was removed about 18 years ago, (we have a photo) consisted of some brick built stables with a granary over the top.
Can we rebuild this to form garaging without applying for PP?. We also have an old barn 24ftx14ft and attached lean to garage 24ftx8ft what restrictions might stop me applying to turn it into accommodation?.

#17 jsharris

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 11:17 AM

It depends on several factors, like the size, position and whether or not any existing permitted development allocation has already been used.

As it's connecting the building to another, that could become habitable, then I'm pretty sure that you would need PP. There is a reasonably good guide on the planning portal as to what does and does not need PP and what can be done under PD. I'd start by looking at the planning portal guidance on PD, but I can't link to it now as they have just taken the whole planning portal down for maintenance over Easter! When it comes back on Tuesday, the url will be https://www.planningportal.co.uk/ and you will need to find the section on permitted development. It used to be pretty good, with an interactive visual guide that answered most questions.

Sadly you can rarely now just ask your local planners, as most charge a hefty fee before you can talk to them, whether you actually need pre-planning advice or just want a simple question like yours answered. You could try having a look at your local authority planning website, as some publish pretty good guidance on their application of local and national policy.

#18 ferdinand

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 11:22 AM

Is it Listed?

F

#19 jonathon916

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 11:28 AM

Thank you. No permitted development rights have been used up, I was thinking about using them on rebuilding what was previously removed, I understand under the guide lines you can add a certain percentage of extra space.
When I carried out a previous restoration some years ago you could walk into your local planning office no appointment necessary, and pick there brains! free of charge, sadly this is no longer the case.

#20 jonathon916

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 12:07 PM

No not listed, some of the old barns which were sold a few years ago are listed, but the house and remaining barn are not.