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Laminate Flooring With Underfloor Heating


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#1 Cs111

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 07:48 PM

Can you lay laminate flooring directly on top of wet ufh or must it be glued down or ?
Any underlay needed etc?
Any difference when laying on top of sand cement screed and liquid?

#2 tonyshouse

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 09:10 PM

Need to wait for screede to Fully dry out

No problem laying on top of ufh so long as there is a structural floor there somewhere

#3 Nickfromwales

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:00 PM

How long ago was the screed laid?
Regards, nick.

#4 PeterW

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:17 PM

View PostCs111, on 22 March 2016 - 07:48 PM, said:

Can you lay laminate flooring directly on top of wet ufh or must it be glued down or ?
Any underlay needed etc?
Any difference when laying on top of sand cement screed and liquid?

Most manufacturers list if their product is suitable for UFH - worth checking as some is not.

The underlay with a lot is just a thin plastic bonded to a foam layer to take the bumps out of the sub floor.

Have a look at an engineered wood that can be bonded down as an alternative as you may be surprised at how much better the product is for not a lot more money

#5 Cs111

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:21 PM

Screed hasn't been laid as yet. Just planning in advance
I thought it could go straight onto the concrete screed, then someone yesterday to me it needs to be glued down

#6 Nickfromwales

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:36 PM

View PostPeterW, on 22 March 2016 - 10:17 PM, said:

Have a look at an engineered wood that can be bonded down as an alternative as you may be surprised at how much better the product is for not a lot more money
Best thing you'll ever do IMHO. Engineered is MUCH better than a basic laminate, and far more stable. Even better if you can stretch to a natural wood veneered one as the floor can be sanded / refinished as life takes it's toll on it. Quick sand and a re varnish and it's as good as new. :). Laminate is in the bin if it gets damaged. :(
Bonded down is far better with Ufh, as long as it's not a liquid screed, as otherwise you may have additional mechanical preparation to do prior to bonding anything down.
Regards, nick.

Edited by Nickfromwales, 22 March 2016 - 10:36 PM.


#7 jsharris

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 10:39 AM

I'd definitely support the view that a bonded down floor is a million times better than a floating floor. I've laid two laminate floating floors in our old house, and despite my best efforts they don't feel particularly solid (they are laid on a concrete floor, with the usual thin foam underlay) and do sometimes creak when you walk on them.

I've laid a lot of strand woven bamboo, 12mm thick, in the new house, over the concrete slab (with UFH) downstairs and over the OSB flooring upstairs. Both floors were bonded down with Sikabond 95 and I'm amazed at how much more solid the floors feel and how well the UFH works with the bonded floor. Bonding the floor upstairs also made a very noticeable difference to noise transmission, and practically eliminated the slight sound we heard downstairs when people were walking around upstairs, presumably because the rubber-like properties of the cured Sikabond act as a good acoustic barrier. There are no creaks or discernible movement anywhere and I'd definitely opt for bonding any floor now, even though Sikabond is bloody expensive.

#8 Nickfromwales

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 11:12 AM

Expensive but very very good stuff. I use it a lot.
;)

#9 Cs111

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 11:25 AM

Just to clarify then
If using laminate, it doesn't need to be glued? But better if it is?
If not gluing do you need an underlay / moisture barrier ?

#10 declan52

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 11:53 AM

Only thing with sticking laminate to a screed is the dead sound it makes when you walk on it. It won't sound or feel solid underfoot.
If you are floating it make sure the underfelt is suitable for UFH and that it says it on the label. The heavy sponge types aren't as they don't let heat through.

#11 Nickfromwales

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 01:57 PM

I'd only float a laminate floor tbh, and I'd only go for V groove in a laminate so you don't have the horrible 'butted up tight' look which is wholly unnatural looking imo.
Float it over the thin foam / poly underlay and observe the expansion joints / perimeters without exception or you'll end up with a magic carpet.
Regards, Nick.