Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

PCM Filled Glazing


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 DamonHD

DamonHD

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,046 posts
  • LocationLondon, UK

Posted 16 March 2016 - 09:09 PM

Here's an interesting one:

http://www.sciencedi...378778816301736

Rgds

Damon

#2 recoveringacademic

recoveringacademic

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,343 posts
  • LocationLancaster, Lancashire

Posted 17 March 2016 - 07:48 AM

Thanks Damon. Needs an institutional login (Lancaster University) but, when used, the text is unavailable.

However, the abstract intrigues.
Might there be a more 'informal' way of accessing the text?

Ian

#3 DamonHD

DamonHD

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,046 posts
  • LocationLondon, UK

Posted 17 March 2016 - 07:57 AM

I just read the abstract, which seems enough to kick off a discussion.

And natch I wonder if it might be better between the two inside-facing panes of 3G...

Rgds

Damon

#4 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:03 AM

Similar I think

Does mention our favourite term on page 4

http://openaccess.ci...Final Draft.pdf

And another

http://www.ibpc2015....D308_FinalX.pdf

And a 1240 page report on building science from the Southern Hemisphere

http://anzasca.net/w...Proceedings.pdf

Bored now, going to hang my washing out as it is sunny B)

Edited by SteamyTea, 17 March 2016 - 08:16 AM.


#5 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:28 AM

Need the 'proper' (restricted) longer read, but on the face of it a no-brainer?

#6 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:31 AM

Is this of any use?

A fair bit of info if you simply google "Phase change material (PCM) applied in the glazing structure".

Edited by joiner, 17 March 2016 - 08:37 AM.


#7 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:32 AM

Anyone care to give a 1 paragraph summary of what it's talking about?

What's PCM in this context?

Edited by joiner, 17 March 2016 - 08:36 AM.
Smartphones! What's a "parsgraph" and "telking"?


#8 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:35 AM

Ain't that the one that I linked to ;)

Going to watch my washing as it changes phase from wet to steam to dry.

#9 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:38 AM

:D Yup. It wasn't the one I thought Id linked to, either, so double error. But then added the bit about the google which rendered it superfluous anyway. ;)

#10 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:59 AM

Good question Dave (Pro)

Phase change is quite simple. Imaging a material that can be solid, liquid or a gas, water is a good example.
Each state will have different thermal properties at different temperatures.
So the heat capacity of ice is different from liquid water or steam.
During the crossover from one phase to another, the temperature stays the say i.e. 0°C or 100°C but the water still releases energy (or absorbs energy).
The numbers can sometimes seem to be totally different from what happens when the material is in just one phase.
So ice has at 0°C:
Density of 916.2 kg/m3 , Thermal Conductivity of 2.22 W/m.K and a heat capacity of 2.050 kJ/kg.k
Liquid water has at 0.1°C:
Density of 999.8 kg/m3 , Thermal Conductivity of 0.563 W/m.K and a heat capacity of 4.217 kJ/kg.k
Steam at 100°C
Density of 0.6 kg/m3 , Thermal Conductivity of 0.0188 W/m.K and a heat capacity of 2260 kJ/kg.k

So you can see that by changing the phase of a material you can release (and store) different amounts of energy (the heat capacity), at different rates (the conductivity) in different volumes or masses (the density).
The trick is to find a material that changes at a temperature that is useful (around 25°C for space heating, 50-60°C for water heating) that has a large positive change in heat capacity at those temperatures, takes up little space and is cheap and safe to use.
And when it comes to being used in windows, transparent.

Edited by SteamyTea, 17 March 2016 - 09:00 AM.