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Advice Needed - Is This Wise?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Paul10000

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 06:49 PM

Hi chaps - I'd hoped to do a demolish and build but things change and it's not going to work. So - I've found an already converted 60's bungalow that to my mind looks really nice - BUT - I've concerns about overheating from the glazing. The vendor says the top glass is 'solar control' they are about 3 metres across - this view is the rear of the house and faces due South. The top floor is a mezzanine sitting about 2 metres back from the glass. As it's right at the top of my budget I can't invest heavily in solar shading. From your vast experience - is this a problem? (The insulation is all around the 0.25 region) Thanks, Paul

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#2 tonyshouse

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 07:42 PM

Thermal model but I reckon it will get too hot too often.

#3 ProDave

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 07:59 PM

My biggest concern with that house would be the flat roof, I would want it properly surveyed to ensure it's not going to give me trouble any time soon.

#4 RoundTuit

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Posted 13 March 2016 - 09:11 PM

Looks great. I reckon that if it meets the majority of your requirements, then don't get hung up on too many 'maybe's'. Accept that it might not be perfect, and that solar gain is not all bad. Put off the new kitchen/carpets/ bathroom for a bit and live in it to see how it suits you. Shading doesn't have to break the bank - just depends on how high up the agenda aesthetics come!

Oh, and +1 for the flat roof.

#5 Paul10000

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 01:04 PM

Thanks for the guidance - the roof is about 4 years old and is Sarnafil - it looks like it's a parapet design but no overhanging trees to clog it up?

We're also concerned about the rest of the windows being very small and lack of light to the interior/bedrooms.

How do you actually work out if the roof installed properly?

#6 Paul10000

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 07:09 AM

Attached File  front.JPG   36.79K   15 downloads We've decided to put in an offer but the wife is concerned about the lack of natural light in the kitchen and master bedroom as the aluminium windows are small.

As I see it the bedroom (ground floor) could have a larger window put in or a roof light. The kitchen has timber cladding above and below and is on the front.

Would larger windows need permission and any ideas if they could be fitted without making a mess of the very nicely done insulated render? Similarly, on roof lights in a warm insulated Sarnafil roof are there any pointers? (The kitchen cant have a roof light as the first floor is directly above it) See photo kitchen window marked K.

Thanks guys.

#7 AliG

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 07:20 AM

A window won't need planning permission unless it's a conservation area or there was a condition in the planning permission for the refurbishment. Both of which look unlikely.

If you plan to spend more time in the kitchen than the lounge, a larger window won't help that much due to it being north facing. We have 2 sets of patio doors in our east facing kitchen and it is still quite dark after 1pm. Depends on your habits in where you spend time in the house.

#8 Paul10000

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 07:28 AM

Thanks AliG - so you're saying that North light is not that bright - wouldn't a double size window make that much difference? Any other 'bright' ideas of how to improve the day light into the kitchen.

#9 AliG

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 07:36 AM

The patio doors in my kitchen replaced windows that were roughly half the size, it is brighter in the morning when the sun is out, but I still like to put the lights on from the afternoon onwards. It would help, but if natural light is important it will never be that light a room.

Is it a small kitchen where you would just cook or a large kitchen where you would hang out? If you would spend most time in the kitchen and are already worried about light I would be very wary of buying it unless you think you have a good fix.

A solution might be if you could knock through to a room on the south side of the house, depends on how much you like things to be open plan.

This is one of the major reasons I am about to build my own house, a lot of houses in the UK, which isn't exactly sunny, are built with little consideration for facing the best direction for natural light.

#10 Paul10000

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 07:45 AM

It's a medium size with an open plan main room - there is a large opening (at least 1 metre square roughly) onto the lounge area.

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#11 ProDave

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 08:04 AM

A larger window in a north facing room will make a big difference. But also remove that fence and the planting in front of the window that will be blocking light from it.

You may need building regulations to enlarge a window.

Do you have wall units on that kitchen wall adjoining the lounge? if not I would open up the upper part of that wall to get light in from the lounge, either completely open or put a window in there.

Edited by ProDave, 31 March 2016 - 08:08 AM.


#12 DavidofMersea

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 10:11 AM

Your house is very similar to mine. The south facing window should not be a problem, mine is 5.7 metres wide and if it gets a bit hot, I just open the window.

As Dave suggests you could take the wall down between the kitchen and lounge, but if that is not possible or desirable, why not demolish the wall between the kitchen and utility room? Also if it is structurally practical/possible, you could put a bigger window in there.

You could also take the top half of the wall down between the kitchen and lounge --- this would give you light whilst retaining both kitchen and lounge if you wanted to keep them seperate

Edited by DavidofMersea, 31 March 2016 - 10:55 AM.


#13 Paul10000

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 06:18 PM

The fence and foliage is a bit misleading it doesn't actually block any light. The opening from kitchen to lounge is about as big as can be done without extensive work - I'm hoping it will be fine with a bigger window and possibly a LED panel light.

#14 AliG

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 06:33 PM

I hadn't seen the plans this morning.

If you are happy just with a bigger window and LED lights then that's the easy option, looking at the plans I wonder if you could actually make the window enough larger to be worth the cost. A lot of it is personal preference. You can also paint the room white.

Having seen the plans, however, I think David's suggestion is the best. It all depends on how much work you want to do and how much money you want to spend. I would guess that the utility room wall is structural as it is under the outside wall on the first floor. But if you made the utility room much smaller, back to the area where the hot water tanks is, then you could create a big eat in kitchen and importantly put in a roof light that would really fix the light issues (that may be a roof light already there looking at the plans). You could possibly put in a west facing window, but that depends on how close the boundary is, although it could be above head height. The utility room seems quite large. But it all depends on what you want to spend

#15 ferdinand

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 06:53 AM

+1.

I'd take the bottom half (on plan) of the utility room into the kitchen to make the kitchen Z shaped, and enlarge the former utility room window.

As is, the Utility looks too large.

If you are redoing the kitchen, the extra budget should be relatively small.

Ferdinand

#16 Paul10000

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:59 PM

All comments received. I've put in an offer so we'll see what transpires. It was converted from a normal 60's 2 bed bungalow, the guy seems to have done it well and to a high spec (aluminium windows, ewi rendered walls etc.)