Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

How To Convince Thieves Our Shipping Container Contains Nothing Of Value?


  • Please log in to reply
74 replies to this topic

#41 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 14 March 2016 - 07:35 AM

I'm now thinking of placing my two containers with the doors facing each other, one fixed in position and the other on rails of some sort. I have a large tree about twenty feet behind the one on rails and am thinking I could use an electric winch to move the one on rails up and down the rails. This would allow me to 'park' the movable container with the doors butted up against the stationary container. Once parked the winch could be removed.

#42 Nickfromwales

Nickfromwales

    Short cuts take three times longer.....Fact

  • Moderators
  • 8,182 posts
  • LocationSouth Wales

Posted 14 March 2016 - 08:38 AM

Sounds like a winner. Pita though, but you gotta do what you've gotta do. :(
Regards, Nick

#43 temp

temp

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,200 posts

Posted 14 March 2016 - 11:05 AM

Next day the crooks will be back with a winch.

#44 jamiehamy

jamiehamy

    Water Tank Conversion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 601 posts
  • LocationGourock/Largs

Posted 14 March 2016 - 10:55 PM

I text the chap whose company did the heavy lifting and steel frame to see if they could weld a plate on the damaged area. He replied saying he'd get it done today. I thought it was maybe a typo, but turned up tonight and the damaged bit was cut out and a new, thicker piece of steel welded on - that's what I call service. Not even that, just how to run a decent business and build up a real relationship.

I am wondering - if I packed a magnesium stick up into the padlock box and sealed it in with putty and a warning sign saying to not tamper - if someone got burnt or something if they set it off while cutting or burning the lock, would I be liable? Half serious question....!

#45 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 15 March 2016 - 06:51 AM

Yes, you would be liable. It's all about intent and foreknowledge. The Yanks have a more pragmatic legal system! Not that it works, mind.

Edited by joiner, 15 March 2016 - 06:51 AM.


#46 stones

stones

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  • LocationOrkney

Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:01 AM

I remember having to escort a prisoner up to hospital for treatment to his broken nose, sustained after the owner of the house he was breaking into laid him out clean with one punch. The sense of victim-hood this guy had when he was being seen by the doctor was a sight to behold, and the doctor was falling for it, sounding very sympathetic and murmuring about the injustice of an assault victim being locked up. That was until I told the doctor about the reasons why he had been punched / injured. I have to say I did begin to feel a little sorry for the prisoner after that, as the Doctors demeanor changed completely. Out went the sympathetic manner, replaced instead by an icy expression and what looked and sounded like extremely painful 'treatment' to ahem, reset his nose.

#47 DamonHD

DamonHD

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,046 posts
  • LocationLondon, UK

Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:12 AM

Interesting... Do you think that the 'burglar' really felt entitled to burgle, or just entitled not to be punched when caught, or something else? I think it may be worth looking at these things from alternative (warped) worldviews, and there will be lots of them I suspect, to best deflect them...

Rgds

Damon

#48 DavidWright

DavidWright

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 326 posts
  • LocationSkye

Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:21 AM

View PostDamonHD, on 15 March 2016 - 10:12 AM, said:

Interesting... Do you think that the 'burglar' really felt entitled to burgle, or just entitled not to be punched when caught, or something else?
As it used to say at the start of Porridge "Norman Stanley Fletcher, you have pleaded guilty to the charges brought by this court, and it is now my duty to pass sentence. You are an habitual criminal, who accepts arrest as an occupational hazard, and presumably accepts imprisonment in the same casual manner." And maybe the odd thump too? Eee, criminals today... :wacko:

#49 stones

stones

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  • LocationOrkney

Posted 15 March 2016 - 10:27 AM

View PostDamonHD, on 15 March 2016 - 10:12 AM, said:

Interesting... Do you think that the 'burglar' really felt entitled to burgle, or just entitled not to be punched when caught, or something else? I think it may be worth looking at these things from alternative (warped) worldviews, and there will be lots of them I suspect, to best deflect them...

Rgds

Damon

He was certainly very unhappy that he was the 'victim' and nothing was being done about it. My experience of the vast majority of housebreakers I dealt with was that they didn't give a damn about how their actions affected others. That said, they were never happy when their own houses got broken into...

#50 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 15 March 2016 - 12:26 PM

A "gang" of 15 year-olds who had rampaged through a quiet street in a nearby market town, destroying a friend's shop window (VERY old bay window) in the process, when caught, taken to the nearby large metropolitan town's cells, charged and placed in the cells, all spent the night crying for their mothers.

I rebuilt and fitted the shop window FOC (she was my wife's best friend, after all) and she claimed against her insurance thinking that they would claim against the lads who would be fined and have costs awarded against them. No chance, they were minors and discharged into the care of their parents on the assurance of their future good behaviour, despite one of them admitting that it had been them who were responsible for a spate of hanging baskets being destroyed over a number of weekends preceding that eventual rampage.

#51 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 15 March 2016 - 01:33 PM

View Poststones, on 15 March 2016 - 10:01 AM, said:

I remember having to escort a prisoner up to hospital for treatment to his broken nose, sustained after the owner of the house he was breaking into laid him out clean with one punch. The sense of victim-hood this guy had when he was being seen by the doctor was a sight to behold, and the doctor was falling for it, sounding very sympathetic and murmuring about the injustice of an assault victim being locked up. That was until I told the doctor about the reasons why he had been punched / injured. I have to say I did begin to feel a little sorry for the prisoner after that, as the Doctors demeanor changed completely. Out went the sympathetic manner, replaced instead by an icy expression and what looked and sounded like extremely painful 'treatment' to ahem, reset his nose.
It's tony Martin all over again. Do you know If the home owner got charged for assault on the thieving scum?

#52 declan52

declan52

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,087 posts
  • LocationCo. armagh

Posted 15 March 2016 - 02:10 PM

He more than likely got brought in and given a firm talking to while his hand was being shuck.

#53 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 15 March 2016 - 05:27 PM

Lets hope so. Touching wood It has hasn't happened to me yet, But i can honestly say i do not know where i would stop if i managed to get my hands on a thief in my own house. Especially if women and children were in the house.......
worrying thought really :unsure:

#54 stones

stones

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  • LocationOrkney

Posted 15 March 2016 - 06:29 PM

View PostConstructionChannel, on 15 March 2016 - 01:33 PM, said:


It's tony Martin all over again. Do you know If the home owner got charged for assault on the thieving scum?

Nothing at all happened to the home owner. Thieving deadbeat was charged and appeared in court,don't know the outcome.

#55 ferdinand

ferdinand

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,031 posts

Posted 17 March 2016 - 06:52 PM

View PostTriassic, on 12 March 2016 - 09:28 PM, said:

What sort of insurance would you suggest for two container loads of furniture?

I'm thinking of camouflaging my containers, any suggestions on the best colour to use?

If it is storage for a period of time, bury it,

F

#56 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 17 March 2016 - 08:58 PM

So I have the two containers sited and now I've decided to paint them so they blend in, I'm thinking green exterior paint. Could I use something like a Matt exterior masonary paint over the existing paint?

#57 ferdinand

ferdinand

    Advanced Member

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,031 posts

Posted 17 March 2016 - 09:13 PM

Don't forget to grow a Russian Vine over them !

Ferdinand

#58 Triassic

Triassic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,239 posts
  • LocationCumbria

Posted 17 March 2016 - 09:20 PM

View Postferdinand, on 17 March 2016 - 09:13 PM, said:

Don't forget to grow a Russian Vine over them !

Ferdinand
Funnily enough that's just what I had in mind. I was thinking if you can't see the containers from the road I'm less likely to get an opportunist having a go at breaking into them.

Edited by joiner, 17 March 2016 - 09:39 PM.


#59 PeterW

PeterW

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 876 posts

Posted 17 March 2016 - 10:45 PM

View PostTriassic, on 17 March 2016 - 08:58 PM, said:

So I have the two containers sited and now I've decided to paint them so they blend in, I'm thinking green exterior paint. Could I use something like a Matt exterior masonary paint over the existing paint?

We painted a 24ft container in this stuff at the local Scout activity centre and it blends into the trees brilliantly. Very hard wearing too...

http://www.ebay.co.u...0&ul_noapp=true

Edited by PeterW, 17 March 2016 - 10:47 PM.


#60 jsharris

jsharris

    Please ignore all posts by me, some are erroneous

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 11,461 posts
  • LocationWiltshire/Dorset border

Posted 18 March 2016 - 08:37 AM

View Poststones, on 15 March 2016 - 10:01 AM, said:

I remember having to escort a prisoner up to hospital for treatment to his broken nose, sustained after the owner of the house he was breaking into laid him out clean with one punch. The sense of victim-hood this guy had when he was being seen by the doctor was a sight to behold, and the doctor was falling for it, sounding very sympathetic and murmuring about the injustice of an assault victim being locked up. That was until I told the doctor about the reasons why he had been punched / injured. I have to say I did begin to feel a little sorry for the prisoner after that, as the Doctors demeanor changed completely. Out went the sympathetic manner, replaced instead by an icy expression and what looked and sounded like extremely painful 'treatment' to ahem, reset his nose.

Around 13 years ago I caught a chap who was using a felling axe to break through a jewellers window on the opposite side of the street. This was in broad daylight on a Friday, mid-morning. I grabbed him from behind in a bear hug (I really have no idea why) and luckily a couple of other passers by, including a young soldier, helped wrestle him to the ground, face down, but not before he'd managed to hit the shop manager a glancing blow to the head with (luckily) the blunt end of the axe. The bloke struggled like hell, and it was as much as we could do to hold him down for the 10 minutes or so before the police arrived. I was squatting on his back, holding his belt and one arm, the young soldier held his feet and the other passer by, a train driver, held his free arm.

The police found that he'd already grabbed £42,000 worth of jewellery out of the small hole he'd made in the armoured glass window and had stuffed it into a bag tied to his wrist. All of us were interviewed and gave statements. I remember giving mine to a young DC up in the jewellers workshop. He asked me to start from the time when I'd first noticed what was going on, which was when I heard loud banging noises from across the street, where I was using a cashpoint, At first I thought it was just builders (there was a skip just up the road), but after I'd got the cash from the machine I looked around and saw a bloke in a black hoodie and trousers trying to smash the jewellers shop window. I didn't think at all, and pretty stupidly just ran across the road and grabbed the bloke from behind. At this point the DC held up his hand and said that as I'd just admitted an offence he would have to caution me. He did, telling me that I'd admitted the offence of common assault and that I needed to understand that I could be charged with this offence. To say I was f'ing angry is an understatement.

Later that day I flew from Old Sarum across to Headcorn in Kent, as a bunch of us were meeting there before flying en masse across the channel to celebrate the centenary of powered first flight, and then heading down to Abbeville for a couple of days before flying back. I told the tale that evening over a few beers with friends, and one of them called the Mail on Sunday. A couple of weeks later this cartoon appeared in a full page article about me:

Posted Image

Those that have met me (or even seen that small photo of me that the Mail got from some website) will realise that I wasn't the sort of typical senior Civil Servant pictured by the Mail's cartoonist. It did get me a lot of unwanted attention though, from appearing on daytime TV, through being given a bloody medal and a commendation from the local Chief Constable, Dame Elizabeth Neville. The latter made me feel a fake, as at the ceremony in the police HQ in Devizes a young lady with two small children went up just before me to collect her husbands posthumous commendation; he'd been killed in the course of his duty.

Edited by jsharris, 18 March 2016 - 08:42 AM.