Jump to content


ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

Because I Think That Some Of You Didn't Believe Me....


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 recoveringacademic

recoveringacademic

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,343 posts
  • LocationLancaster, Lancashire

Posted 09 March 2016 - 11:43 AM

when I told you that I found a Great Crested Newt swimming in the dog's bowl recently.....

Attached File  IMG_20160309_111314.jpg   18.08K   4 downloads

same bowl.... same goddam newt (well that's a guess).

They are all meant to be tucked up in their little wooden beds dreaming of - well whatever newts dream of. Drink, I expect

#2 jsharris

jsharris

    Please ignore all posts by me, some are erroneous

  • Member Blogger
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 11,461 posts
  • LocationWiltshire/Dorset border

Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:01 PM

If they are that prolific in your local area, you really do need to question the very, very expensive "kid gloves" tactics of the ecology lobby. My guess is that the damned things will survive no matter what you do around your area, as the habitat there should be pretty good for them.

I sometimes think we worry too much about the level of "protection" we give to certain species, and whether less expensive and intensive ways of managing the risk to particular species shouldn't be adopted.

I'm reminded of a tale I've told here before, of a friend who was trying to get PP to build on what had, many years ago, been an orchard, but had long since been cleared of trees and was now a large area of mown grass that was part of his garden. Because there was an old OS map that showed the land had once been an orchard (as had the land our house now sits on, we're right on top of what was once Mill Orchard), he had to get all manner of ecological surveys done, for bats, badgers, you name it. He even took photos of the nice, flat, mown lawn and sent them to the planners to argue that sod all, other than earthworms and some insects, were living on that land, but the planners still insisted that he waste his money and the ecologists time, in getting the relevant surveys done.

#3 recoveringacademic

recoveringacademic

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,343 posts
  • LocationLancaster, Lancashire

Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:59 PM

Well, I have come to love them. Honestly.

They made me pause, gave me time to think, gave me time to plan, and that has already resulted in very significant cost savings. The nett benefit to us is in the order of £10,000. Coupled with the support from all the kind ebuild people, and the networks we have now made, on balance they are a good thing.

Of course our context is not typical, but it isn't atypical either.

You are right about the ecolobby: we have since made a friend of an ecologist who knows the locality. His personal, un-researched opinion is that they are broadly spread. His advice was to use the hedgehog test.

What's that?

If it's squashed on the road, there are enough of them to be common off the road. When was the last time you saw a squashed hedgehog? No, I can't remember either. For the past few months -no, year- I've been kicking cadavers over on our lane when walking the dogs. Mostly GCNs and a few toads, one or two frogs, no hedgehogs. That's it.

This area is GCN Central

#4 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 09 March 2016 - 01:19 PM

It is well known that GCN are not rare in the UK.

So you could have napalmed it all two years ago. :D

#5 joe90

joe90

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 847 posts

Posted 09 March 2016 - 02:20 PM

Same here with Bats, loads of the nuggets even though the house burnt down, they live in the surrounding acres of trees, I also love them but they have cost me a few thousand and about a year of my life, bless them!

#6 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 09 March 2016 - 05:23 PM

have you considered keeping a few in a semi aquatic tank? just to see what they get up to in the day....

#7 ProDave

ProDave

    Self build in the Highlands

  • Moderators
  • 5,960 posts
  • LocationScottish Highlands

Posted 09 March 2016 - 05:36 PM

It's funny how different LA's behave.

We have a burn running through our plot, so a riparian habitat. I also know there are bats around here as I see them often but I don't know where they roost.

But not one question or condition asking us to do anything or any form of survey.

I suspect in some places I would be spending thousands on surveys and reports.

#8 Barney12

Barney12

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 393 posts

Posted 09 March 2016 - 08:45 PM

View PostConstructionChannel, on 09 March 2016 - 05:23 PM, said:

have you considered keeping a few in a semi aquatic tank? just to see what they get up to in the day....

Judging by the volumes the op has on his plot I would imagine the answer to that question is; "shag" :)

#9 Barney12

Barney12

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 393 posts

Posted 09 March 2016 - 08:52 PM

View Postjsharris, on 09 March 2016 - 12:01 PM, said:

If they are that prolific in your local area, you really do need to question the very, very expensive "kid gloves" tactics of the ecology lobby. My guess is that the damned things will survive no matter what you do around your area, as the habitat there should be pretty good for them.

I sometimes think we worry too much about the level of "protection" we give to certain species, and whether less expensive and intensive ways of managing the risk to particular species shouldn't be adopted.


I completely agree. We are jumping through numerous hoops to provide mitigation stratedgies for bats on our plot. The reality is that the population arround here and available roosts is HUGE. In fact the population is so large that some people have massive problems with volumes of 'bat poo' in their lofts.

Of course the other point is that "protection" also becomes a "racket"! Ecologists are making plenty of money from legislation!

#10 recoveringacademic

recoveringacademic

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,343 posts
  • LocationLancaster, Lancashire

Posted 09 March 2016 - 08:58 PM

View PostConstructionChannel, on 09 March 2016 - 05:23 PM, said:

have you considered keeping a few in a semi aquatic tank? just to see what they get up to in the day....

Naughty naughty naughty. Unlawful, bad boy. Do not pass Go and do not collect £200.

They sit and contemplate the meaning of life. They don't move at all.

I know because I kept some in my classroom 'wildlife tank' . Many years ago.

#11 ConstructionChannel

ConstructionChannel

    Local Youtuber

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,723 posts
  • LocationNW Essex

Posted 09 March 2016 - 09:06 PM

View Postrecoveringacademic, on 09 March 2016 - 08:58 PM, said:

Naughty naughty naughty. Unlawful, bad boy. Do not pass Go and do not collect £200.

They sit and contemplate the meaning of life. They don't move at all.

I know because I kept some in my classroom 'wildlife tank' . Many years ago.

woah, i was only asking if you had considered it........ but really? whats the charge?
is it the same for non protected species?
what if it was hurt and you nursed it back to health??

and you say they contemplate the meaning of life... did you record them when no one was looking?? they might be up to more than you think :)

Edited by ConstructionChannel, 09 March 2016 - 09:06 PM.


#12 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 09 March 2016 - 10:04 PM

What do they taste like?

#13 RoundTuit

RoundTuit

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 57 posts
  • LocationNorth Cambs

Posted 09 March 2016 - 10:11 PM

*
POPULAR

View PostSteamyTea, on 09 March 2016 - 10:04 PM, said:

What do they taste like?

A cross between bat and red squirrel, but fishier. :)

#14 joiner

joiner

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 10,718 posts
  • LocationWest Midlands

Posted 30 April 2016 - 08:28 AM

GCN delays are as nothing compared to this...

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-36173247

#15 recoveringacademic

recoveringacademic

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,343 posts
  • LocationLancaster, Lancashire

Posted 30 April 2016 - 08:40 AM

Yes, Joiner.
I am now starting to lose patience. Our ecologist messed up - he didn't read a key email from Natural England - and so our application was submitted late. If we are lucky we'll get permission soon. And then we'll have to wait a further 80 days potentially.

The new, almost completed, Lancaster-Heysham link was delayed 2 full years by newts.

Acquaintances of ours have almost finished their house -about the same size as ours, and located a few hundred yards down the road- and they got full PP after we did.

I understand that newts have no bargaining power, and that we ought to be responsible builders. But even I'm getting professionally cross. There is an obvious, avoidable lack of balance in the system and in the attitudes of ecologists to the end-in-mind : getting badly needed houses built.

#16 Alphonsox

Alphonsox

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,495 posts
  • LocationCounty Down, NI and Forest of Dean, England

Posted 30 April 2016 - 08:44 AM

It's Marder time again! We'll known to all car owners in central Europe. Strictly they are European Pine Martins and a bit bigger than the Weasels we have here. They usually restrict themselves to eating the electrical leads in cars. Having had their Volvo's HT leads destroyed by one my friends in Switzerland now have deterrent alarms fitted to their vehicles to keep them off.
Looks like this one got over ambitious and chewed through one of the the mains supplies to Cern, I am very surprised they weren't expecting this.

Edited by Alphonsox, 30 April 2016 - 08:45 AM.


#17 SteamyTea

SteamyTea

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,322 posts
  • LocationCornwall

Posted 30 April 2016 - 09:08 AM

Time to check up how well your environmentalist is covered. Make them pay for the delay.
It is one way of valuing nature, and will bring it home to the liberal do-gooders.

Edited by SteamyTea, 30 April 2016 - 09:09 AM.


#18 Barney12

Barney12

    Regular Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 393 posts

Posted 30 April 2016 - 11:16 AM

View PostSteamyTea, on 30 April 2016 - 09:08 AM, said:

Time to check up how well your environmentalist is covered. Make them pay for the delay.
It is one way of valuing nature, and will bring it home to the liberal do-gooders.

No chance.
They all set out their stall with "no guarantees", "no certainties", "no responsibility".
The "system" is weighted against the common man, ecologists are licenced by Natural England if they're not they can't do the job. There is no free market or competition in the world of Ecology and no politician who wants to protect his image will go within a country mile of the issue!!