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Ex Brickie Thinking Of A Return To The Life


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16 replies to this topic

#1 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 07:23 AM

Hello
I used to build extensions and other small private work before the credit crunch ruined everything. I've been a reinstater since for a utilities company where I make good money but the days are long and boring. I long for the freedom of working for myself again. The state of the trade when I left, late 2008, has left me nervous about volume of work and prices etc. Has the trade recovered enough to go for it again?

#2 joe90

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:13 AM

Hiya Liam and welcome, being self employed is always a risk as you know, I may well need a brickie this year for a whole house ( in Devon) and they are not that easy to come by down here I have been told.

#3 SteamyTea

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:24 AM

Welcome Liam
Have you thought of doing 'alternative' bricks.
Things like brick slips and cladding work.

#4 brickie

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 10:24 AM

Where are you based,Liam?

#5 Triassic

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 10:55 AM

So you've been through one credit crunch and know how bad things can get working for yourself, next time you will be ready, cash put aside, good payers kept happy, work on recommendations, don't work for slow payers. keep work and life in balance. Go for it!!

#6 Nickfromwales

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 11:24 AM

Too right it has. !
Down my neck of the woods there's a massive amount of building work, both site and private, and rates are higher than they've been for a good while.
Get the WD40 out, polish the tools up and get to it.
Probably a very good idea to ring around and update your pricing structure first though ;)
Regards, Nick.

#7 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 08:51 PM

I am based northwest specifically greater Manchester

#8 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 08:52 PM

View Postbrickie, on 01 March 2016 - 10:24 AM, said:

Where are you based,Liam?
northwest, greater Manchester area. Sorry haven't got the knack of this quote thing

#9 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:05 PM

View Postjoe90, on 01 March 2016 - 09:13 AM, said:

Hiya Liam and welcome, being self employed is always a risk as you know, I may well need a brickie this year for a whole house ( in Devon) and they are not that easy to come by down here I have been told.
shame I don't live in devon joe. Would be nice to hit the ground running with that kind of job

#10 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:06 PM

View PostSteamyTea, on 01 March 2016 - 09:24 AM, said:

Welcome Liam
Have you thought of doing 'alternative' bricks.
Things like brick slips and cladding work.
dont really know much about it but i suppose I'd have a crack at it if I had to

#11 declan52

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 09:18 PM

More akin to tiling than laying bricks. A lot easier on the back,wrist and knees also.

#12 LiamB76

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 10:44 PM

View Postdeclan52, on 01 March 2016 - 09:18 PM, said:

More akin to tiling than laying bricks. A lot easier on the back,wrist and knees also.
i enjoy a bit of tiling, not sure about on a professional level though. I hear what your saying about the back and the knees. A concern that has slightly put me off getting back into it sooner

#13 declan52

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 10:47 PM

The first few blocks you lift will feel like they have been soaked in water for a month and takes a while to get used to the hacks in your skin so salt and vinegar crisps are of the menu for a while.

#14 Nickfromwales

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 10:52 PM

What will you be getting 'out of' to go back on the tools?
Regards, nick.


#15 LiamB76

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 07:07 AM

View Postdeclan52, on 01 March 2016 - 10:47 PM, said:

The first few blocks you lift will feel like they have been soaked in water for a month and takes a while to get used to the hacks in your skin so salt and vinegar crisps are of the menu for a while.
wise advice indeed. We've all made the salt n vinegar mistake

#16 LiamB76

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 07:12 AM

View PostNickfromwales, on 01 March 2016 - 10:52 PM, said:

What will you be getting 'out of' to go back on the tools?
Regards, nick.
i went building manhole chambers for a utilities company but somehow found myself labouring on a tarmacer. Filling in holes. It's easy work but it's soul destroying. Same thing over and over like Groundhog Day. The only thing I will miss is the money. 30k pa. long hours though

#17 joiner

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Posted 02 March 2016 - 01:29 PM

It will definitely pay to pick up some "extra" knowledge, if you haven't already got it, and aiming for the niches in the market. Conservation courses can be both personally rewarding and profitable, so doing a course on stonework, lime(s) and rendering might be worth looking into. It's what a mate of mine did a few years back and he's never out of work. No1 son also dipped in when he worked on his own barn conversion and so has that as another string in his construction bow.

A lot of the specialist lime companies run day courses.

Edited by joiner, 02 March 2016 - 01:30 PM.