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Hot Glue Guns / Decent Alternative?


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#1 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:11 PM

I was sort of prototyping the other night with the time-lapse mount and i thought to myself " I need a hot glue gun like at school"

Are these the only option for fixing something quickly and well enough?

are there professional dramatically better versions?

is this 400w version worth the extra tenner? or will a 20w £4 do exactly the same job?
http://www.ebay.co.u...fIAAOSw~gRVydIx


any thoughts welcome

Ed

#2 SteamyTea

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:18 PM

A nail gun is a good alternative, or maybe a shot gun when frustration gets too much.

If you are after a quick bond, the low and hot melt are pretty good.
If you are after a strong bond, then PU and epoxy are good. Some of the industrial PU are fast (actually some use the hot melt processes, thermosetting).

#3 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:29 PM

View PostSteamyTea, on 29 February 2016 - 06:18 PM, said:

A nail gun is a good alternative, or maybe a shot gun when frustration gets too much.

If you are after a quick bond, the low and hot melt are pretty good.
If you are after a strong bond, then PU and epoxy are good. Some of the industrial PU are fast (actually some use the hot melt processes, thermosetting).

the guns stay locked away for that exact reason...... imagine the money it would cost me if i had it to hand more often :lol:

when you say "low and hot melt" why would i use a low melt?

QUICK weakish bond is all I'm after really

#4 SteamyTea

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:36 PM

Possibly low melt you used at school, hot melt is the same, just a higher temp.

Luckily when I was at school we used real UHU, kept in a paper bag in our desks.
Marker pens were fun too.
The 1970's were so interesting, the year I left school is the year they made Ecstacy illegal, imagine that, only thing that made Latin tolerable and unmemorable.

There is a who website about hot melts:
https://www.hotmelt....ne-pur-hot-melt
(I got some interesting results googling that)

Edited by SteamyTea, 29 February 2016 - 06:39 PM.


#5 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:46 PM

you get ecstasy in the classroom and i get to smoke outside at the pub,
I don't think much happened in 2003? possibly changed smoking from 16 to 18 all the other laws were already in place because you lot had already given reason for them :P

if no one else suggests a better option i am going to buy that gun and these sticks after dinner
http://www.ebay.co.u...n3BWm8MMHZmai8g

#6 jsharris

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:52 PM

I have been using a cheapo one from B&Q (I think it's branded Loctite) for several years. It's one of the low power jobbies. Works fine, and is generally handy for both fixing things quickly where you don't need a strong bond and it's brilliant for repairing cracked polythene containers (like those storage crates that crack easily in very cold weather). Because the commonly available hot melt glue is really polyethylene, so the same stuff as the plastic boxes, it pretty much welds them back together. I even managed an emergency repair on a badly cracked 25 litre site water container, that had cracked around the handle and was leaking (and couldn't be picked up because one end of the handle had broken right off). I did that temporary repair around 2 years ago and the container is still fine.

The main disadvantage of the low power guns is that they take ages to heat up, very frustrating when you want to glue something together quickly. Mine can take around 10 minutes to get up to working temperature and if there are higher powered, temperature controlled ones available then they are probably a better bet.

I buy hot glue sticks in bulk, not because I use a lot of the stuff, but because it's damned expensive to buy the packs of six sold in the DIY sheds. Funnily enough I took delivery of 100 glue sticks last week, for the princely sum of £19.99, inc VAT and delivery. A pack of 6 of the same sticks in B&Q would be £5, so 83p per stick rather than the 20p a stick by buying in bulk.

#7 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 06:58 PM

good enough for me.

These sticks are sub 10p a stick? are they all much the same or does the transparency make a difference?

I like the sound of the PU hot melts but having seen the price that is not the tool for this job.

#8 jsharris

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 07:08 PM

The commonly available glue sticks are mainly some form of low melting point polyethylene, with some added tackifier agents to improve the bond to some materials (it's the stuff that leaves the surface of hot melt glue feeling slightly tacky after it's cooled). Watch out for the size and length of the sticks. The most common general purpose sticks are around 11.2mm diameter and 160mm long. A fair few of the really cheap sticks around are only 100mm long, so not as good value as they might at first seem. You can get special guns for fine work that use 7mm diameter sticks, but they aren't so easy to get hold of (pretty much every DIY shed will stock 11.2mm diameter sticks 160mm long).

I've found that all the low melt translucent sticks seem very similar, so similar that I've never been able to tell them apart. I think the bag I bought a week ago were Silverline, but they look and behave exactly the same as the far more expensive Loctite and Bostik branded ones I've used.

#9 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 07:46 PM

thanks for the help guys. dinner is done (belly pork, very nice)
and tools have been bought,
£21 all told with 50no 11mm :unsure: x100mm sticks :)

#10 recoveringacademic

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Posted 29 February 2016 - 09:25 PM

View PostSteamyTea, on 29 February 2016 - 06:36 PM, said:

The 1970's were so interesting, the year I left school is the year they made Ecstacy illegal, imagine that, only thing that made Latin tolerable and unmemorable.

Ave Steamy!
amo semper extasis meus amor......

#11 SteamyTea

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 07:38 AM

Silly sod

#12 temp

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 05:27 PM

I got a cheap hot melt gun for my kids school projects. It's amazing how many glue sticks you go through so glad we went for a deal that came with loads of sticks in the bundle.

#13 SteamyTea

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Posted 01 March 2016 - 05:42 PM

There is a place called MacSalvers in Cornwall (the Cornish crowd will know of them as they have big cranes too), they do big bundles of long ones really cheap.
So cheap that I have had some for about 10 years now.
I need to get a new gun though. Mine is a low powered one and I pull too hard on the trigger/feeder. So got a broken ratched now.
May spend more than a fiver next time.

Edited by SteamyTea, 01 March 2016 - 05:43 PM.