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5:1 Pva To Keep Dust Down?


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#1 Onoff

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:12 PM

In the old days, when I got my first house then PVA went in EVERYTHING. I'd put it in render, mortar, concrete even plaster. Generally 5:1 (water/PVA) to mix up whatever and put on neat between coats.

Just done a concrete floor in the downstairs bathroom. 5:1 (ballast / cement) mix with added waterproofer / deaerator.

Thinking to whack down some 5:1 PVA to keep the dust down.

Will this be detrimental to when I tile later on?

Cheers

#2 tonyshouse

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:17 PM

No

#3 Onoff

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:24 PM

 tonyshouse, on 23 February 2016 - 06:17 PM, said:

No

No don't do it or no it won't be detrimental to tiling later on? :lol:

#4 declan52

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:30 PM

I done my floors with it to kill the dust and tiles where fine.

#5 Onoff

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:45 PM

 declan52, on 23 February 2016 - 06:30 PM, said:

I done my floors with it to kill the dust and tiles where fine.

Cheers. It's what I've always done in the past but since joining here I've found most of what I've done was old hat and there's much now better methods! :lol:

#6 declan52

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 06:52 PM

Your only using it to kill the dust not as a primer for tiles.

#7 jsharris

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 08:23 PM

I did it on the advice of the MBC guys, primarily to keep the dust down and also to make cleaning up a LOT easier. Glad I did, as I didn't seal the garage slab with PVA and every time I sweep it out I get loads of dust.

It also made bonding down the travertine and the bamboo flooring easier, as the adhesive spreads a lot easy easier over the the sealed floor.

Edited by jsharris, 23 February 2016 - 08:23 PM.


#8 Onoff

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 08:44 PM

I wonder if this would be better, Everbuild's SBR Bond, references that it has advantages over PVA:

https://www.google.c...114733917,d.d24

Edited by Onoff, 23 February 2016 - 09:37 PM.


#9 Nickfromwales

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Posted 23 February 2016 - 09:54 PM

Quite important to saturate the floor rather than just 'wipe it over' with the pva mix ;)
That allows a decent bit of 'bite' ensuring good purchase for adhesives etc when fixing to the floor.
Regards, Nick.

#10 Onoff

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 08:03 AM

 Nickfromwales, on 23 February 2016 - 09:54 PM, said:

Quite important to saturate the floor rather than just 'wipe it over' with the pva mix ;)
That allows a decent bit of 'bite' ensuring good purchase for adhesives etc when fixing to the floor.
Regards, Nick.

Assume that has to be the waterproof/exterior grade PVA? I read elsewhere warning people off of PVA on the grounds it remains water soluble and can be catastrophic should water get under the tile later. But surely that is only for the interior grade a good quality, exterior / waterproof PVA would be alright?

http://www.diynot.co...n-query.267189/

Can I do the floor with PVA to dust proof like now, 4 days after laying? Guessing I can? I've a lot to get on with in there as in dropping down pipes and wooden framing and don't want to be kicking up too much concrete dust.

Cheers.

#11 stones

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 08:39 AM

Does sealing with PVA effect the slab drying out process / time?

#12 Onoff

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 09:36 AM

 stones, on 24 February 2016 - 08:39 AM, said:

Does sealing with PVA effect the slab drying out process / time?

That's what I was wondering. I'm only guessing but wonder if it's a case that as the slab cures through chemical reaction it's low level heat that gets dissipated? In that case can't see the PVA film being an issue. Or would the PVA film hold in moisture and slow things down?

All a bit technical for me! :lol:

#13 jsharris

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 10:23 AM

It didn't seem to make the slightest difference to me. I literally poured diluted PVA on the floor, then spread it with a soft broom, making sure it soaked well in everywhere. It certainly bonded well, as when I went around breaking off all the bits of plaster that had been dropped on the floor with a bolster, the PVA stayed bonded to the concrete.

#14 Onoff

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Posted 24 February 2016 - 05:18 PM

Missus complaining just now that she can taste dust in the air as I've been wandering in and out of the bathroom taking the screeding rails off etc. Whoops! :(

Need to decided whether I can "PVA" (or similar), this soon after laying the slab! Any thoughts?

#15 Onoff

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Posted 25 February 2016 - 09:50 AM

Been reading that laid concrete should be kept wet whilst it cures. Inside the centrally heated house figuring that's even more important?

Debating whether to just vacuum up the existing dust of the floor then just cover the floor with Antinox/ Correx and tape all the joints. That would keep the moisture in the slab if that's what it needs.

It would then give me a dust free surface to work off off.

But, reading further and there is a suggestion that to check if your concrete is cured, tape a 12"x12" test patch of DPM to the floor. If there's condensation under it after 24hrs it's still curing. Guessing if I put the Correx down now the whole underside will condensate?

#16 Onoff

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:32 PM

Good or bad I've just mixed up some Cementone SBR at 5:1 dilution and spread that on the new concrete with a broom. The dust was a bit of a pain what with carrying it through the house.

#17 Nickfromwales

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 07:00 PM

SBR is the next up from basic PVA so that should see you right. ;). One benefit with SBR is that it tends to stay tacky ( open ) for a lot longer than PVA, but shouldn't matter for the sealing of floors either way.
For tiling, or rather directly BEFORE tiling, I'd recommend using a flexible primer specifically for tiling. This stuff will see the tile adhesive bond like shnizzle to a blanket.
Regards, Nick.

#18 Onoff

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 08:24 PM

 Nickfromwales, on 27 February 2016 - 07:00 PM, said:

SBR is the next up from basic PVA so that should see you right. ;). One benefit with SBR is that it tends to stay tacky ( open ) for a lot longer than PVA, but shouldn't matter for the sealing of floors either way.
For tiling, or rather directly BEFORE tiling, I'd recommend using a flexible primer specifically for tiling. This stuff will see the tile adhesive bond like shnizzle to a blanket.
Regards, Nick.

I imagine (the time I take) that the SBR might scuff off as I'm working in there! I've given the floor two coats anyway. Was a tad worried the SBR might impede the flexible primer later on?

#19 Nickfromwales

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 11:52 PM

Try laying the flexi prime when your ready. If it collects ( like water on a waxed car bonnet ) then just stick with the tile adhesive, laid direct to the floor :)
Regards, nick.