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Home Security System Thoughts


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#21 billt

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 09:45 PM

The drive camera is a Hikvision DS-2CD2232-I5 and the front door camera is a Hikvision DS-2CD2332-I, about £60 each from China. Unfortunately they're not so readily available from there anymore and they're a bit more expensive bought from a UK supplier.

The originals of those pictures are a lot better - the forum software has compressed them a lot more and made them a softer.

They are recorded at full HD and you can choose the amount of compression used.

In camera recording won't be any better, as the compressed stream is the same.

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#22 oranjeboom

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 10:26 PM

Thanks Billt for the info. Good to know for when I come to get some cameras later on - what cabling do I need to install for these cameras? Intention is to fit behind the cladding, so best I do that now, rather than rip the cladding off in 6m time!!

#23 pudding

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Posted 09 February 2016 - 11:29 PM

Cabling - CAT 6 cable everywhere ;) then cameras that are POE is all you need.

#24 billt

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 08:31 AM

They're POE cameras, so only need one CAT5e cable for each camera. Unless you're running the cable miles CAT5e is quite adequate and easier to handle.

#25 declan52

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 08:46 AM

Do you have them recording all the time onto a hard drive or do the only start when someone sets of a pir sensor.

#26 billt

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 09:39 AM

They use motion sensing. I started off by using a program called Blue Iris running on my file server which has software motion sensing which will work with any camera. Unfortunately Blue Iris is a CPU hog and it was getting near to 100% CPU use with only 4 cameras.

Recently installed a Hikvision NVR, which uses in camera motion sensing to trigger recording. Disadvantage is that, although the NVR will work with other makers cameras, the motion sensing only works with Hikvision cameras. The NVR has alarm inputs which could be used with external triggers like a PIR for triggering recording, but I've found that motion sensing works well enough, although you can get excessive triggering with wind blown foliage if you don't mask shrubbery off carefully. Heavy rain or snow will also trigger recording on one of the cameras.

#27 declan52

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 10:12 AM

Where i would want a camera facing there is a very busy road that my drive comes of so if it picked up every vehicle then it would be recording all day long. So would have to be able to adjust the sensitivity to combat this. We get a lot of traveller folk who call round looking to know if you want your roof/drive powerhosed when all they want is a scouting mission to see what you have. Done next door in broad daylight.

#28 jsharris

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 10:18 AM

The system I have allows you to select around 60 active zones in the image. It displays a grid of dots on the screen in set up mode and you chose which dots will be active for motion sensing. You can narrow things down so that it only motion sensor triggers over a pretty narrow area of the screen, of irregular shape if need be. The motion sensing is built in to the DVR with my system, not the camera.

#29 stones

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 12:09 PM

Given my previous occupation, this may seem an odd view, but I have never been impressed with alarm systems. I think they are far more trouble than they are worth. Monitored systems in particular are eye wateringly expensive to install and service. The overwhelming majority of alarm calls I ever attended were false alarms, usually gremlins in the system. I always formed the view that an alarm system singled out domestic properties as worthy of criminal attention. Good overall security, window and door locks etc are far more practical ways of keeping your property and loved ones safe and secure.

Over the course of my career, the number of house break ins dropped significantly, primarily I think because once expensive items became cheap and readily available to either buy (think DVD player for £15) or shoplift, which was a far less risky proposition for the would be criminal.

#30 Alphonsox

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 12:57 PM

General advice seems to be that you don't want to be the first or last person in your street to install a system. All an alarm system is doing most of the time is persuading the scrottes to move onto an easier target.

#31 SteamyTea

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 01:17 PM

I found out how to set of my car alarm earlier.
Just open the bonnet without unlocking the car (I have a Ford now).

#32 temp

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 08:50 PM

Take a look at the Visonic wireless alarm system. Works for us. Can be used with other makes of bell box if you don't like theirs. The key fobs seem to work well - we almost never use the keypad on the panel. Their "quad" series wireless PIR sensors also seem good. Has a GSM option but we use land line.

Our camera system is a seperate roll your own system but they may have an integrated system now.

#33 oranjeboom

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 10:05 AM

View Postbillt, on 10 February 2016 - 08:31 AM, said:

They're POE cameras, so only need one CAT5e cable for each camera. Unless you're running the cable miles CAT5e is quite adequate and easier to handle.

Just resurrecting this. I'm looking at having 2 cameras on my 'east wing' of the house. I presume I'll be needing two cable runs for them? Thanks

#34 mike2016

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 10:40 AM

Yes,
One per camera, they can't be linked in series.

As an FYI - I met Mobotix at Frankfurt Light & building this month, they've some very good software although the cameras aren't cheap (all POE). Will be considering their range if I can afford it!

Cheers
Mike

#35 Kev78

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 01:47 AM

My alarm and security system works great :)

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#36 joiner

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 05:52 AM

"A Power over Ethernet PoE Camera utilises a technology that integrates power into a standard LAN infrastructure. PoE enables power to be provided to the network device, such as an IP phone or a network IP camera, using the same cable as that used for network connection. It eliminates the need for power outlets at the IP camera locations and enables easier application of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) to ensure 24 hours a day, 7 days a week operation. Outdoor cameras as well as PTZ cameras and Dome cameras have a power consumption that normally exceeds this, making PoE functionality less suitable."

#37 PeterW

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 07:06 AM

Some of the outdoor cameras use a higher voltage - up to 48v - to get round the power issues as they basically upped the voltage and kept the current low.

There are plenty of POE cameras about, one manufacturer now does a feed that takes a USB storage device so you can add whatever size you want

#38 SteamyTea

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 08:38 AM



#39 DavidofMersea

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:18 AM

View Postjsharris, on 09 February 2016 - 05:56 PM, said:

The problem with any external box, dummy or otherwise, is that most of the scrotes will know the foam gun trick (ladder up to the box, drill hole with cordless drill, fill the box with expanding foam then wait ten minutes for it to go off and silence the sounder).

Would the scotes really bother with all that, wouldn't they just go somewhere else, unless you have something they really want .

Also what do you want a CCTV for? All you get is a picture of the scotes robbing your house, it is unlikely to keep them out

#40 jamiehamy

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:38 AM

We've had two incidents with intruders - we've moved and added cams but it would have been helpful to know when it happened, what type of vehicle and how many people. Also, if it was the same people.

hopefully the new setup would give us more information since it covers the key parts of the site and sends pics over the air instantly.