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Storage Of Furniture And Other "Stuff"


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#1 Triassic

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 04:55 PM

We have an offer on our current home, so it looks like we will be moving onto site soon. Has anyone got an experience and suggestions regarding the storage of furniture and all the other stuff you accumulate along the way. We had in mind to acquire a 20 foot steel shipping container, to line it with insulation and fix shelving inside. We also have a dehumidifier to help keep the place dry.

Thoughts?

#2 RoundTuit

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 05:13 PM

Coincidentally, I've been to look at a couple of self-storage places today, as we've just accepted an offer on our current place. It's gradually dawned on me that it's not going to be practical to try and store much in the way of furniture in the 'working' site container, so I might need one on site, and somewhere else to store the accumulated 'household essentials'. Both places had un-insulated 20ft containers available outside, and one also had 20ft containers in a big shed. My concern for furniture was condensation and damp, but both reckoned that if furniture went in dry, it would stay dry (although to be fair, they also suggested a polythene cover to be safe, and a bucket of salt in the corner to absorb moisture). Insulation and a de-humidifier sounds like a good plan.

#3 Triassic

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 05:28 PM

We also looked at local self storage companies, one is a series of containers outside with no insulation. We read that uninsulated containers can be a problem, resulting in condensation dripping on the items stored inside.

The other is an unheated warehouse, they provide a very large box, into which you stack your stuff, they screw down the lid/front, then it's fork lifted into a stack of other boxes in the warehouse.

Both are quite expensive, hence my question about self storage options using a container on site.

Edited by Triassic, 09 January 2016 - 06:42 PM.


#4 recoveringacademic

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 05:35 PM

Exactly (to the foot) and to the dehumidifier what we've done.

Edited by recoveringacademic, 09 January 2016 - 05:36 PM.


#5 ferdinand

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 09:18 AM

View PostTriassic, on 09 January 2016 - 04:55 PM, said:

We have an offer on our current home, so it looks like we will be moving onto site soon. Has anyone got an experience and suggestions regarding the storage of furniture and all the other stuff you accumulate along the way. We had in mind to acquire a 20 foot steel shipping container, to line it with insulation and fix shelving inside. We also have a dehumidifier to help keep the place dry.

Thoughts?

Get a refrigerated container. That is insulated.

But consider disposal too; if you take it to bits there will be humungous amounts of insulation which are difficult to dispose of; I know from experience.

So imo get one good enough that you will be able to sell it afterwards.

Or a secondhand Portacabin which will be insulated and wired for electricity. Half site office; half storage. From a few hundred on ebay. Get a smallish one and a Hiab may be able to drop it over the fence.

On shelving I'm a fan of freestanding Ikea IVAR bought secondhand off ebay for about 10-15% of new price. No drilling. Line the floor with osb to disperse the point loads.

Ferdinand

Edited by ferdinand, 10 January 2016 - 09:30 AM.


#6 Triassic

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 09:32 AM

The problem I have is a narrow access track to the site, I was thinking a steel container could be dropped at the end of the track and using skates, we could drag it up the track onto site, not sure a portacabin would survive being dragged.

#7 ProDave

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 09:35 AM

How about a static caravan? You can get old ones very cheap and that could be towed up the track on it's own wheels.

#8 Triassic

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 10:21 AM

I'd have to widen the track first, it's only 8 foot side and has a problematic turn half way up.

#9 declan52

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 10:23 AM

If you can't get a caravan down the lane how are you going to get all the lorries loaded with materials on to site. A good access road is a must have on any site.

#10 Triassic

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 02:28 PM

The access is tight, so we've got plans in place to get materials on site and the design has been modified to use lighter materials, posi joists rather than concert beam and block, an off-loading area at the gate and a fork truck to move stuff onto site. The TF supplier will be making smaller or manageable panels and will bring a tractor and trailer with A frame to move the panels etc.

My wife's main concern is how all her furniture and other stuff (books, cloths, kitchen ware etc) will fare stored inside a container and this Is the area I was interested in getting feedback on.

Edited by Triassic, 11 January 2016 - 12:39 PM.


#11 Triassic

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 07:26 AM

I looked at a couple of containers today and noticed each had ventilation holes in them, if I were to use one for storage would you recommend blocking up the vents to stop damp air entering the container and causing condensation?

I intend to line the container with EPS, but wondered what sort of thickness would be sufficient to stop condensation. I've also got a dehumidifier to remove moisture.

#12 Barney12

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:02 AM

View PostTriassic, on 12 January 2016 - 07:26 AM, said:

I looked at a couple of containers today and noticed each had ventilation holes in them, if I were to use one for storage would you recommend blocking up the vents to stop damp air entering the container and causing condensation?

I intend to line the container with EPS, but wondered what sort of thickness would be sufficient to stop condensation. I've also got a dehumidifier to remove moisture.

We have a vented (one in each corner at the top of the wall) shipping container which is full of our belongings/furniture from the last house and have had no issues with damp or condensation at all. It is sat on a thick hardcore base, has a thick timber floor and the doors are incredibly well sealed. We bought it brand new (well the usual one trip scenario) for £1,800+VAT.

I've never really understood why we have no issue as everywhere you read that it's a massive problem. ?

#13 DavidFrancis

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:28 AM

Is it well shaded? We have a well-ventilated shed with a metal roof that has some large holly trees immediately to the south, so gets very little sun on it and probably has low radiant heat loss at night. The corrugated sheets never have more than a sheen of condensation on the underside even on a cold morning.

#14 Barney12

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:48 AM

View PostDavidFrancis, on 12 January 2016 - 08:28 AM, said:

Is it well shaded? We have a well-ventilated shed with a metal roof that has some large holly trees immediately to the south, so gets very little sun on it and probably has low radiant heat loss at night. The corrugated sheets never have more than a sheen of condensation on the underside even on a cold morning.

Its tucked in a corner up against a high tree/hedge line. But, one wall faces pretty much South so not really.

#15 joe90

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 09:31 AM

I have a container down in Devon with tools etc in it, I was going to insulate it but time ran out, it was supposed to have been taken away by now but the bloody planners are taking forever, I am surprised but it has no condensation that I have seen so far ( yet to get really cold tho)

#16 bitpipe

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 09:57 AM

I bought a 25ft container / site office from ebay for £1600 plus £250 to get it delivered. It's obviously been cut down from a 40ft originally, the front 10ft is a fully fitted site office (steel door, glass sliding window with steel shutters, plastered walls, laminate floor, power & light) and the rear is 15ft of storage space.

I insulated the ceiling with 50mm of EPS as before I started to fill it properly, I got the internal rain issue on the first frosty day (there's a thread about this). it's now packed to the rafters with our stuff (all in boxes) and I have a dampstick to keep it dry, lasts about 4 months before needing replacement.

It's been a great buy - was able to re-route the BT drop wire to the office (that was a saga) so have maintained DSL and phone service to the site, data is sent to the caravan over powerline adaptors and I strung a temp phone line for voice.

The groundworkers and MBC have used it extensively as tea hut, shelter and overnight tool store and I can also store bits and pieces there securely and use the office in the evenings and weekends.

I looked into hiring one but was cheaper to buy (and you only pay once for transit vs both ways for hire). I plan to sell it on for what I paid for it.

One thing to note on location, HIAB drivers will only go onto hard standing, if you want to have it delivered over on soft ground (i.e. garden) they will need to use a trackmat system which can easily add a few hundred to the bill. Or you can use a machine on site to move it as they're not heavy when empty.

Edited by bitpipe, 12 January 2016 - 09:58 AM.


#17 ferdinand

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 10:18 AM

The one that we had for 25 years was bought complete with lorry trailer, and for keeps. It came in down our second field-drive, which had grown new thickets of trees by the time we sold.

And the bloke next door had a 40ft one which he unloaded by using *two* Hiabs working one at each end :-). I think he even kept his digger in it.

Ferdinand

Edited by ferdinand, 12 January 2016 - 10:31 AM.


#18 ferdinand

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 10:42 AM

View Postbitpipe, on 12 January 2016 - 09:57 AM, said:

I have a dampstick to keep it dry, lasts about 4 months before needing replacement.

There are also coatings which can be applied to metal to manage condensation and prevent dripping - Grafo-Therm is one, but there are others. Best contact may be a local corrugated roof supplier.

They absorb moisture and release it as humidity varies, and and typically used in industrial buildings afaik.

Ferdinand

Edited by ferdinand, 12 January 2016 - 10:43 AM.


#19 Triassic

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 12:35 PM

Thanks for all this excellent information. I'll look on line for a one trip container and see if I can get a good deal!

#20 temp

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Posted 12 January 2016 - 01:50 PM

If you decide to rent a storage container do shop around as rent varies a lot. Haggle and perhaps offer to rent for a minimum period to get a better rate. Get them to show you the actual container you will be renting rather than the nice new one next to the site office :-)