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New Builds, Camper Vans, Trade Vans And Caravans


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#1 SteamyTea

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 12:48 PM

Just been a bit on the radio (You and Yours) about some new housing developments not allowing vans on the drives.

Good way to create a middle class ghetto.

#2 Crofter

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 12:58 PM

Yes I was just listening to that. Wouldn't get far up here, every other house has a rusty tractor outside :D

I wonder how tight the definitions are- could you ply line a Berlingo, remove the rear seats, and voila; is that a car or a van?

#3 ProDave

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 01:13 PM

A lot of new developments have restrictive covenants prohibiting things like caravans parked on your drive.

My understanding, is that is is largely to protect the developer. They don't want the first residents of a new development making them look tatty before they have sold the whole development.

Whether they bother to enforce these covenants once the whole development has been sold and the builders have moved on is another matter.

It is surprising how few people biother to check the covenants before buying a house. When I was last house hunting it was always a question I asked when I viewed a house, as a no caravan or trailer covenant would make the house useless to me. But I must be rare in asking that, as nobody ever knew the answer.

My very first house had such a covenant and I broke it by parking a caravan, but nobody ever said anything.

Edited by ProDave, 06 January 2016 - 01:13 PM.


#4 SteamyTea

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 01:42 PM

Personally, I like caravans on peoples drives in High Wycombe. Stops then being down here.

#5 stones

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 01:47 PM

I certainly recall a long list of covenants when we bought a house on a small development. The two that stick in my mind were repairing vehicles on the driveway and the keeping of poultry. I would agree that they are generally designed to help the developer sell his houses, so I doubt they would do anything once offsite. Neighbours could still move to enforce the covenants, although how much that would cost / how easy it would be is another matter.

#6 notnickclegg

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:01 PM

View PostProDave, on 06 January 2016 - 01:13 PM, said:

It is surprising how few people biother to check the covenants before buying a house. When I was last house hunting it was always a question I asked when I viewed a house, as a no caravan or trailer covenant would make the house useless to me. But I must be rare in asking that, as nobody ever knew the answer.

I think covenants are more usually looked at by your solicitor during the purchase process. Certainly that's when the covenants on our plot became apparent.

View PostProDave, on 06 January 2016 - 01:13 PM, said:

My understanding, is that is is largely to protect the developer. They don't want the first residents of a new development making them look tatty before they have sold the whole development.

Whether they bother to enforce these covenants once the whole development has been sold and the builders have moved on is another matter.

Might be the primary focus, but I could also see the argument that they benefit your neighbours, and as such, they'd have the right to enforce them.

Jack

#7 doofaloofa

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:12 PM

View PostCrofter, on 06 January 2016 - 12:58 PM, said:

could you ply line a Berlingo?

I can over my wife's dead body, apparently

#8 SteamyTea

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:35 PM

I turned my old Scenic into a camper van for a bet. Was quite good, even made a shower that ran of the camping stove.
Would I be allowed to park that in my drive?

#9 ferdinand

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:39 PM

View Poststones, on 06 January 2016 - 01:47 PM, said:

I certainly recall a long list of covenants when we bought a house on a small development. The two that stick in my mind were repairing vehicles on the driveway and the keeping of poultry. I would agree that they are generally designed to help the developer sell his houses, so I doubt they would do anything once offsite. Neighbours could still move to enforce the covenants, although how much that would cost / how easy it would be is another matter.

The poultry one is sensible on new developments since rats will be encouraged if the owners don't know about keeping chickens.

Would the other one be about keeping oil out of the drains and encouraging bods to do their repairs in their garages?

I suppose it could also be because a trade van may well be an extra over the normal number of cars.

F

#10 ferdinand

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 02:41 PM

Vanoraks might like to read this (325 post) thread on Gardenlaw about this issue:

http://www.gardenlaw....php?f=9&t=6617

ferdinand



#11 temp

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 05:50 PM

I've seen one precluding you setting up a steam engine on your land so this sort of thing has been going on awhile.



#12 ProDave

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 05:53 PM

View Postnotnickclegg, on 06 January 2016 - 02:01 PM, said:

I think covenants are more usually looked at by your solicitor during the purchase process. Certainly that's when the covenants on our plot became apparent.

Yes, but I didn't want to start the process of buying a house, only to find out late in the process that it's not suitable and have to withdraw from the deal and bugger everybody else up.