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Some New Houses Too Small. Discuss


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8 replies to this topic

#1 SteamyTea

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 01:07 PM

Bit from RIBA

http://www.thisismon...tects-warn.html

#2 daiking

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 01:23 PM

I bought a 3 bed semi-detached house built in about 1963. According to the EPC and my own measurements, it had an internal area of 72 sq m. Which is why I've had to spend all my disposable income for the next 15 year upfront to extend it. We moved from a turn of the century 2 bed terrace that was about 90 sq m (inc. cellar) but frezzing cold with no garden.

British houses are too small but I don't think its a new problem. I don't think My own house was n't built to Parker Morris* standard even though it was built, just after '61. The bog isn't separate.

*Nearly typed Parker Knoll :D

Edited by daiking, 02 December 2015 - 01:26 PM.


#3 SteamyTea

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 01:46 PM

I used to do work for Parker Knoll. Would not get one of their sofas in my house.

#4 recoveringacademic

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 02:13 PM

As written, the implication is that the area is too small for the average (not modal) family size.

And so commits to type yet another instance of statistical illiteracy and sloppy journalism.
Steamy, so far my day's been hard enough without you pointing out yet more nonsense.

#5 Roger440

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Posted 02 December 2015 - 08:36 PM

Sadly not new news.

I have friends who have bought new houses, but i just dont get it. Why would you (at the more normal end of the market that is)?

#6 sketch3d

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 09:25 AM

If they didn't design new houses too small or badly laid out I would be out of a job. Long may it last!!

Edited by joiner, 18 December 2015 - 10:48 AM.


#7 oz07

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 10:38 AM

We're more time poor these days. A lot don't have time for or enjoy diy to maintain property. Low maintenance is probably one of the main factors.

Edited by joiner, 18 December 2015 - 10:48 AM.


#8 SteamyTea

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Posted 03 December 2015 - 10:51 AM

Are we really time poor, I often wonder. I think it just seems so as you get older.

#9 jayroc2k

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 10:44 AM

I agree that is a historical problem. The classic two up two down house has been the the preserve of peasants (Victorian era) while middle class lived in 3 storey Victorian houses.

Then came along the developers who started splitting larger houses into flats, the average converted flat is terrible, I see several 45sqm 2-bed flats in London.

For newbuilds, the minimum size set for 1-bed was set at 45sqm, in recent times a minimum of 50sqm was "recommended" but it's enforcement depends on the council (many London developers have now started meeting this standard to appease planners).

There are still numerous 65sqm houses. Personally if it were not for the garden space, I'd prefer a 65sqm flat for the simple reason that there is no lost space to stair cases.

Edited by joiner, 18 December 2015 - 10:49 AM.