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Anyone Played With The Cc3200 Chip For Iot


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#1 mikesharp01

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:30 PM

Hi, just got my CC3200 development board and was wondering if anybody else has had play with what looks like an amazing little device for IoT based controls .

#2 mikesharp01

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 08:41 AM

Hmm i guess not, or away from PC. Basically the IoT (internet of things) should allow us to give every device in the home its own web site, so everything is controllable and everything can cooperate with each other. The chip at the heart of this board has a wifi and an ARM processor in one device, it needs about 6 external components to get it going and has loads of I/O. My first job is going to be to create a light (LED) bulb which has a built in occupancy sensor. Then I want to work on energy management getting the fridge / freezer to cooperate with the PV system, the immersun unit and the under sink water boiler etc. Will let you know how I get on.

#3 DamonHD

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 08:49 AM

I am currently running an IoT industrial research project, but it is intended to be rather lower power (and easier to deploy securely on a large scale) than WiFi would allow for example.

http://www.earth.org...d-research.html

We are doing some work on occupancy (and we do some with our OpenTRV product too).

I shall be following your progress!

Rgds

Damon

#4 Alphonsox

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 08:53 AM

This board looks interesting but it really depends on what you want to do with it. An ARM M4 core with wifi is going to result in higher power consumption than a device using an ARM M0 core plus Bluetooth Smart. Whether this is a problem depends on the application but I wouldn't be using one for remote battery powered sensors or actuators.

Assuming you do need a board with level of processing power and communication capability is there any reason you don't want to use Raspberry PI or Arduino boards for your application ? There is a huge amount of existing hardware, software and interfacing experience available. Personally I wouldn't be looking to reinvent the wheel.

#5 DamonHD

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 09:08 AM

Picking up on Alphonsox' comment: our work is indeed based on Raspberry Pi and Arduino, the latter tweaked to reduce power consumption, eg to have a sensor/actuator unit run for a year or two off a pair of AA cells.

Rgds

Damon

#6 Alphonsox

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 09:17 AM

What method of communication are you using Damon ?

#7 jsharris

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 10:53 AM

Butting in on the comms side, I've been pretty impressed with the speed and reliability of the simple to use ERF modules from what used to be Ciseco: https://www.wireless...ed-radio-module . I've had a pair operating the link between my excess PV measurement unit, outside by the meter cabinet and the 20A immersion heater switch unit upstairs in the services area. Unlike some simple radio link systems the ERF seems to be an exceedingly reliable transceiver that is very easy to use. Being able to use a USB SRF (https://www.wireless...o-use-usb-radio ) to easily get data from a link into a PC or other device that supports USB is useful, too.

#8 DamonHD

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 11:34 AM

At the moment Alphonsox we are using a very simplistic and somewhat messy hotch-potch of protocols on top of an 868MHz OOK carrier/bearer as used by the FS20 protocol.

eg see https://github.com/opentrv/OTRadioLink

We are straightening that out somewhat and adding GSM (cellular) and LoRa bearers as drop in replacements.

GSM is going to suck power, but it is a useful fallback for tricky locations. LoRa will get us up to 10km.

Rgds

Damon