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Ventilation And Air Quality Strategy In Rented House


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#1 stones

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 06:12 PM

Well, one week living in our rented house, which unlike our old house ( and three before that) does not have mechanical ventilation, we are really noticing the difference in terms of air quality inside. The weather has been such that we have been able to throw open windows to air the house, but as we move from autumn into winter, leaving windows wide open all day long isn't really going to be viable.

We are renting a 5 bedroom house, which consists of a small stone farm workers house, extended massively in 2004. Effectively the owners bolted an entire house onto the side of the stone building, which itself became the living room. A pleasant benefit is that the house is still banded for council tax purposes as band A, saving me £700 a year :) .

The house has UPVC DG, but there are no trickle vents to be seen. There are four extraction fans in the house - three in bathrooms and the cooker hood.

The added complication is that the former tenant was a smoker, and did use two of the rooms to smoke in. In fairness to the landlord, he has spent a lot of time scrubbing the place down and then redecorating. There is however, still a lingering background smokiness in one room as well as the background aroma of air fresheners that were put in the house (which was vacant for 3 months) to help neutralize the smoking odour (although both have vastly improved over the last week following a thorough daily airing).

Ultimately, I know I'm going to have to open some windows (on half latch) to get some ventilation air into the house. It's how I deal with condensation and improve internal air quality in general when the weather is such that opening windows isn't realistic - looking for suggestions / experience of;

Dehumidifiers

Air Purifiers

and an outside possibility on the air quality side touched on by Jeremy;

Ozone generator

#2 wmacleod

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 07:14 PM

It annoys me when I see houses like that which don't have trickle vents - especially in the bedrooms where they are essential in many cases to keep air quality up. At least you have extractor fans in the wet rooms. Most effective dehumidifier I ever used was in the caravan I used a desiccant/wheel type which was very effective at removing moisture at lower temperatures. Would leave it running overnight and most days and it would pull huge amounts of moisture out of the air and provide a little background heat.

#3 stones

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 08:44 AM

No other takers ? :(

The house we rented over the winter was much the same, in that it didn't have trickle vents in the windows. What it did have was the extract vent for the cooker hood facing into the prevailing wind. The grille fitted to that vent was permanently open, thus ensuring a constant flow of fresh air into the house. Not an ideal solution by any stretch of the imagination.

Condensation in the bedrooms and bathrooms was still an issue, and one that even now, is showing signs of being a problem in this house, so I am certainly thinking a dehumidifier is a must, as is a ban on air drying clothes inside (tumble drier and fluffy towels await!).

Anyone have anything to say about air purifiers (good / bad / indifferent / waste of money) or indeed an ozone generator?

#4 declan52

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 08:54 AM

Is it possible to install a humidity controlled fan.
My mum has a few of the pots with the crystals in them and they do seem to work. The amount of water in them is unreal. Think she got them from asda.

#5 Alphonsox

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 09:05 AM

Would it be possible to install a PIV unit in the loft ? I realise this would require a hole in the ceiling somewhere which the landlord may not appreciate but this could be done discretely in a cupboard or similar.

#6 DamonHD

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 12:54 PM

Would the landlord allow you to install a single-room MHRV or two? They don't have to be that expensive.

Rgds

Damon

#7 joe90

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 01:14 PM

The temporary house we bought to last us two years is the same, concrete walls with no insulation, no trickle vents in the new upvc windows???, summers ok but last winter was dire, mould on walls and ceilings. I tend to leave all windows locked on "slightly open" . If we forget to crack a window at night you notice by 3am the air is not nice. We were going to have EWI with a grant but as this is now withdrawn and we have been told it will not raise the value of the house by the amount it costs it's a non starter. Better get on with our new build then.

Edited by joiner, 28 August 2015 - 01:49 PM.


#8 stones

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Posted 05 September 2015 - 06:13 PM

Thanks all, a few suggestions I can discuss with my landlord tomorrow.