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The Great "Thermal Mass" Myth


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#281 SteamyTea

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 08:38 PM

Damp has mass and thermal properties, so not really off topic.

I was at an art show today, that is off topic.

#282 doofaloofa

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:07 AM

View Postjsharris, on 31 March 2016 - 03:43 PM, said:

However, the widespread view that damp on the lower part of walls was "rising damp" did lead to changes in building practices that reduced the probability of penetrating damp, things like the introduction of DPC, with a 6" (150mm now) splash zone below it. The reality is that just ensuring that floors were 6" above the splash zone probably prevented far more damp problems than the DPC.

I agree, and would add most of the older building whose materials and practices allowed rising damp to present have been fixed making the condition rarer still

Sorry to be a prig about the issue Mr Harris. I just think because you are usually right on the money when it comes to advice, when a statement is made that is clearly unsupported by the facts it should be picked up on and clarified

To keep up standards etc

#283 SteamyTea

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:13 AM

Doofaloofa
In the interest of balance, have you got some example of undisputed rising damp?

Edited by joiner, 01 April 2016 - 09:02 AM.


#284 jsharris

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:41 AM

View Postdoofaloofa, on 01 April 2016 - 08:07 AM, said:

I agree, and would add most of the older building whose materials and practices allowed rising damp to present have been fixed making the condition rarer still

Sorry to be a prig about the issue Mr Harris. I just think because you are usually right on the money when it comes to advice, when a statement is made that is clearly unsupported by the facts it should be picked up on and clarified

To keep up standards etc

Just to be clear, I haven't made a single statement here that was not supported by fact.

I performed experiments to determine if water would wick up through common building materials. Those experiments showed me that, with the exceptions I clearly mentioned, water does not wick up through most common building materials. Not once did I say, infer, or imply that water never wicks up through materials, I was quite clear in stating that it was an uncommon phenomenon and listed two materials (soft fired brick and lime mortar) where I had seen some limited evidence of moisture wicking up through the material.

For decades damp in the lower part of walls has been referred to as "rising damp" much of the time. At around the time I bought our first house "rising damp" was pretty much the universal cause given for damp in walls. The facts seem to show that this is not true for the majority of such cases, and that penetrating damp and condensation are significantly more likely to be the cause of damp in walls than moisture wicking up from the foundations.

Edited by jsharris, 01 April 2016 - 08:41 AM.


#285 gravelld

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 09:01 AM

I think the problem was your original use of the word "myth" which sounds more pervasive than I think you were suggesting.

#286 jsharris

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 09:09 AM

View Postgravelld, on 01 April 2016 - 09:01 AM, said:

I think the problem was your original use of the word "myth" which sounds more pervasive than I think you were suggesting.

Perhaps, but I did make it clear in the final paragraph of the first post I made in this thread referring to "rising damp" what I meant:

View Postjsharris, on 29 March 2016 - 09:46 AM, said:

I'm personally convinced that "rising damp" is pretty much a myth, and that 99% of internal damp problems come from other causes. The only exception would be that some forms of soft-fired bricks do seem pretty porous, as does lime mortar.

Note that I was careful to state that this is my personal belief, and that I did highlight that there were some materials where water could wick up, and I did not say that "rising damp" never occurs, just that it was uncommon.

#287 Nickfromwales

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 09:17 AM

Some "statements" also need to be taken with a pinch of salt. :rolleyes:
Even more so when the associated / prior / post statements in the same thread quite clearly provide enough info to clear up any generalised information contained in any one post. ;).

Let's remember that were not writing legislation here eh?

Let's move along now shall we, as I, for one, think the legs have been walked right off the mythical part of this thread.
Normal service can now be resumed. :)
Regards, Nick.

#288 doofaloofa

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:08 PM

tell that to my unicorn!

#289 Nickfromwales

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:27 PM

That's more like it ;)
:)