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ebuild is sad to announce its closure - it has become too time and resource intensive to develop, manage and maintain.

However, ebuild will remain on-line in archive mode (ie no posting facilties) for several weeks so that users can use it as an information resource.

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#21 Triassic

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 04:36 PM

Or you could simply cut through the wall https://www.youtube....h?v=YNIrSxRurco

#22 joiner

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 05:02 PM

I've known that Eurolocks were "vulnerable" for a while, but not how easy it was to get past them. That video really brought it home.

I briefly went back into the retail side of the upvc business in 2005 and it was common knowledge that if anyone was having a problem with their lock then pretty well any fitter could sort it for them, although I personally didn't know that a degree of breaking and entering was involved. (Says a lot about some upvc fitters :rolleyes: .) I thought it had more to do with a specialist knowledge gained over time, despite the fact that replacement handles and locks were involved. Ah well.

#23 jsharris

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 05:50 PM

*
POPULAR

View Postwmacleod, on 08 January 2015 - 03:56 PM, said:

An old banger of a car left out on the drive of course as well to let them know no cash likely left lying around. Keep the expensive motor in the garage!

Reminds me of the deal I did with the developer for the first house we bought in Scotland. The house was one of six on a small development on the shore of Loch Ryan, about 3 or 4 miles North of Stranraer on the Rhins side of the loch, that was the builders first foray into development. We bought the first finished house on the site, and I gathered that there hadn't been a lot of interest, as the developer was very willing to negotiate on price and throw in some extras. I got him to turf the garden and put down a concrete base for a summerhouse, then asked if he could chuck in an extra hardstanding alongside the garage, so I could store my small yacht there during the winter (in summer she sat on a mooring pretty much in front of the house).

This was the limit of his negotiation, and although he did it he placed a condition in the missives. Bit of an odd one, certainly the oddest one my lawyer had seen. The extra hardstanding was provided subject to me not using the garage to store my car, but leaving it parked on the hammerhead in the drive, always facing forwards, for a period of one year after completion.

The lawyer had questioned the developer's lawyer about the condition, who explained that the developer wanted visitors to the development to see a BMW parked there (I had a fairly new 325i at the time).........................

#24 wmacleod

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 06:26 PM

Radio Scotland on the way home - lady from lv.com telling us that the biggest growing issue is keys left under the mat/stone/gnome.... and even odder, she said they paid out insurance monies as "everyone does it"!

#25 jsharris

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 06:53 PM

View Postwmacleod, on 08 January 2015 - 06:26 PM, said:

Radio Scotland on the way home - lady from lv.com telling us that the biggest growing issue is keys left under the mat/stone/gnome.... and even odder, she said they paid out insurance monies as "everyone does it"!

Years ago Mother ran an old Volvo estate (a 245, IIRC). As a farmer, this spent it's life parked in the yard, and she must have done at least 200k miles in it over the years. Eventually she decided to trade it in, but ran into a problem, so called me over to the farm. The ignition key was stuck in and wouldn't come out. I tried WD40, diesel, you name it and I couldn't get the key out. I asked her how long it had been in there "around 12 years, I think" was the answer.......................

The house was the same, it was never ever locked, for as long as I can remember. I'm not even sure she knew where the house keys were for years.

Edited by jsharris, 08 January 2015 - 06:53 PM.


#26 SteamyTea

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 09:49 PM

Very rare to have farm houses locked. Needed to get in quick for the phone and first aid kit.
Most of the farms I have been to over the last few years are unlocked and vehicles have the keys in. Saves dropping them in the mud.

I went to the same school as this guy.
http://en.wikipedia....Martin_(farmer)

Edited by SteamyTea, 08 January 2015 - 09:51 PM.


#27 recoveringacademic

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 02:06 PM

View PostNickfromwales, on 06 January 2015 - 07:41 PM, said:

This is what would be in my locks...
http://www.mul-t-lock.co.uk
Hi Nick, I was at a presentation the other day where a locksmith 'fettled' one of those '...anti-snap solutions...' in about 5 seconds. She used a short length.... (hold on ... what am I saying?)

Her point during the demonstration was simple: that type of (barrel) lock takes less effort than almost any other to bypass. Because of the design of many UK doors, that type of lock is often used, but it's construction is inherently weak.

#28 slidersx200

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 07:32 PM

My parents' garage was broken into years ago using the snap method of entry and I had to employ the technique myself in order to replace a lock on a second hand door that didn't come with a key. A sales rep who called at our site said he was shocked to find his £6k Internorm sliding door was defeated by the same means while he slept.

It makes a mockery of highly sophisticated multi point locking systems when an intruder can get to the operating parts easily and quietly. Unfortunately, it is almost an inescapable problem, as almost every factory produced door employs eurocylinder locks, but I arranged for our doors to be supplied without handles and locks so I can pick the "least bad" of what is available.

Hopefully a visible alarm system (that will also alert neighbours/family members) and perhaps some cameras will be a deterrent before any burglar gets close enough to see the lock and by choosing a cylinder that limits their means to attack it, or at least hinders them I just hope they'll leave in search of easier pickings.

A word of caution to anyone considering an internal thumb turn; some models can lock you out unless you leave the thumb turn in the right position and then your anti snap, anti pick, anti bump, anti drill lock won't be your best friend! I wanted this type to avoid using keys from inside and as to my mind, they would be better from an airtightness perspective, but the research continues...

Edited by slidersx200, 09 January 2015 - 07:35 PM.


#29 recoveringacademic

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 01:01 PM

View Postslidersx200, on 09 January 2015 - 07:32 PM, said:

A word of caution to anyone considering an internal thumb turn; some models can lock you out unless you leave the thumb turn in the right position and then your anti snap, anti pick, anti bump, anti drill lock won't be your best friend! I wanted this type to avoid using keys from inside and as to my mind, they would be better from an airtightness perspective, but the research continues...

Thanks for the nudge sliders....... I was considering a thumb turn lock..... but if you use the internal thumb turn won't you be inside the building anyway? Another way of saying the same things is - for the returning owner there must be at least one lock with the thumb turn in the right position?

(Thinks....) Ah yeah, kids. Hmmm. :unsure:

I'm really luck to have a mate who is a brilliant lock-smith. And an earthy sense of humour.

Edited by recoveringacademic, 10 January 2015 - 01:03 PM.


#30 slidersx200

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 01:10 PM

I quote:

CAUTION - ABS Thumbturn Cylinder Operation

Care should be taken when using the ABS thumbturn cylinder.
The thumbturn is spring loaded to comply with the new TS008 maximum security standard, this is a security feature whereby the thumbturn cannot be "fished" to unlock the door from outside.

THE THUMBTURN MUST BE PUSHED IN TO TURN AND MUST BE RELEASED BACK TO ITS ORIGINAL OUT POSITION AFTER EVERY OPERATION: This is a design feature to ensure that the lock is always in the correct position to resist external attack.


IF THE THUMBTURN IS LEFT IN THE MIDWAY POSITION (IE: THE SPRING MECHANISM HAS NOT RELEASED) YOU WILL ENCOUNTER A PROBLEM INSERTING THE KEY FULLY FROM THE OUTSIDE.

On a lever outside / lever inside operation door this means that you could be locked out if a member of your household has locked the door from the inside and not returned the thumbturn to the correct position.
On a pad outside / lever inside operation this means you could lock yourself out of your home if you do not return the thumbturn to the correct position on opening the door, and the door closes behind you. In this instance we recommend an ABS double cylinder should be installed.

Edited by joiner, 10 January 2015 - 03:03 PM.


#31 Nickfromwales

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 03:01 PM

View Postrecoveringacademic, on 09 January 2015 - 02:06 PM, said:


Hi Nick, I was at a presentation the other day where a locksmith 'fettled' one of those '...anti-snap solutions...' in about 5 seconds. She used a short length.... (hold on ... what am I saying?)

Her point during the demonstration was simple: that type of (barrel) lock takes less effort than almost any other to bypass. Because of the design of many UK doors, that type of lock is often used, but it's construction is inherently weak.
I was referring to the anti pick qualities of the mul t lock barrel vs other types. I fitted these to my front door ( solid wood ) in conjunction with a Yale type lock.
The PVC back door was an euro lock, so I got a different type off my mate which has the turn catch off centre of the barrel. I then fitted it the wrong way around so the lock has nearly no protrusion. I had to machine my key ( posh word for lots of filing ) so it had enough of the important bit to fit into the lock and operate it.
I'll post a pic ;).
Regards, Nick.

#32 joiner

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Posted 26 January 2015 - 09:09 AM

Update...

http://www.northyork...?articleid=8291