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Anyone With Encyclopaedic Grand Designs Knowledge


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#1 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:19 AM

I remember seeing a Grand Designs where the timber cladding was made offsite in panels and then liften onto brackets on the walls.

Don't suppose anyone can remember what episode that was?

#2 wmacleod

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:34 AM

Sorry, no idea about episodes, but I would think really carefully about that look. It may well look very modular and might look slightly uncharacteristic for what is a natural material. Would expect it be quite a bit more expensive as well as you are going to have significant metalwork to hold the timbers appropriately.

#3 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:47 AM

I think it might have been the Midlothian episode about 30mins in, pic attached shows them being lifted into place. I don't remember them being so big as this, I also remember them being made in the carpenters workshop so maybe there is another episode as well.

If anyone can think of it I'd really appreciate the push in the right direction

Attached Files



#4 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:51 AM

View Postwmacleod, on 28 July 2014 - 11:34 AM, said:

Sorry, no idea about episodes, but I would think really carefully about that look. It may well look very modular and might look slightly uncharacteristic for what is a natural material. Would expect it be quite a bit more expensive as well as you are going to have significant metalwork to hold the timbers appropriately.

What I was thinking was to lay the cladding down, then screw batten onto the back which means when the panel is liften up and set on the counter battens on the wall the is no fixing visible. I'll be having vertical cladding so the look won't be any difference to that when done the normal way, just no fixig visible.

I'm sure the one I remember had an angle on the battens and counter battens that meant the panel would be held to the wall without fixings

#5 Nickfromwales

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 01:24 PM

Secret nailing with stainless brads is near invisible ;). Lot less planning and surely must be cheaper. :-/
Regards, nick.

#6 joiner

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 02:36 PM

Chamfering the battens is a good idea, but getting the alignment of adjacent sections exact enough not to be visibly, irritatingly, out of line is going to be fun!

#7 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 07:22 PM

I was thinking about doing the cladding profile a bit like the attachment, this shows 60 x 21mm a 5mm gap then a 38 x 21mm board so the profile isn't flat. I like things with texture and was thinking the play of light on this profile would create interesting shadows.

Attached File  Cladding profile.pdf   37.41K   8 downloads

The cladding will be vertical so hopefully getting the gaps between the panels would be that hard as they would just have to be on the of the 5mm "gaps".

However I don't know if this idea is possible as I wouldn't want the 38 x 21mm boards to start bending.

The sizes I picked are the trim boards from this website http://www.silvatimb...h-cladding.html and cutting the wider one in half. Maybe I need different sizes for this to work. Any advice from someone who has worked with wood very welcome.

Edited by joiner, 28 July 2014 - 08:33 PM.
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