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Interior Door Frames - Advice Please


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36 replies to this topic

#21 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 23 April 2016 - 06:59 PM

My plan is also to just fit the Proper linings and protect them while it is being plastered,

another thing to mention is if you are planning to cut in your hinges with a router and hinge jig, do so before you put the architrave on

#22 JanetE

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 07:42 AM

We've talked about shadow gaps before but decided it was too difficult/expensive now we are using plasterboard. We are considering just doing them round the doors using this;

http://www.barbourpr...news016813.html

We should be able to just fix it to the outer frame and butt the actual door frame up to it.

Edited by JanetE, 24 April 2016 - 07:43 AM.


#23 TerryE

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 11:40 AM

View PostConstructionChannel, on 23 April 2016 - 06:59 PM, said:

Another thing to mention is if you are planning to cut in your hinges with a router and hinge jig, do so before you put the architrave on

Already thought about that one. :) I haven't got a hinge jig, because it just wasn't worth it for fitting the odd door, but with this number of doors it will pretty essential -- especially if we decide to use triple hinges (to get the alignment spot on) as has often been mentioned on the forum I've already decided that I will need to tool up further. I've got a reasonable table saw, but I will need a basic planner / thicknesser that can work up to 140mm, say.

#24 ConstructionChannel

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 02:26 PM

Increasing the arsenal is never a bad idea ;)

#25 TerryE

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Posted 24 April 2016 - 05:28 PM

That only problem is that once we've finished the new house and sold the old one, we won't have any place to store it all so it's going to be eBay time!!

#26 Nos

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 07:15 AM

A bit late but on the same topic, why cant I put my internal doors in as I go along building the stud walls ? its me doing all the work, its dry lining, so no wet plaster. Doing it this way means the doors+frames will all be square and true, I can screw from the studwork into the side of the frame, no screw holes to fill, here in France the doors come already fitted into the frame, complete with all the ironwork. I have gone for solid oak which has been factory painted in a RAL color to match the external door, they come with pre painted architrave to fix after the walls are painted. Any thoughts on this way of doing this? Nos

#27 Woodgnome

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 03:58 PM

Might be a bit late for you, but if you are going to put shadow beads around the liner's, I would make my liners out of 45mm timber, and put a groove for the bead to slot into, as opposed to butting up to the frame. The standard liners will look a bit mean with a shadow gap next to them. I'll put a pic up later.

#28 JanetE

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 07:40 AM

View PostWoodgnome, on 25 April 2016 - 03:58 PM, said:

Might be a bit late for you, but if you are going to put shadow beads around the liner's, I would make my liners out of 45mm timber, and put a groove for the bead to slot into, as opposed to butting up to the frame. The standard liners will look a bit mean with a shadow gap next to them. I'll put a pic up later.

We haven't got as far as preparing for plastering yet, if you have a picture it would be good to see it. Thanks :)

#29 TerryE

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 07:52 AM

@Nos, yours is an untypical case, and the solution that you propose could work well for you. In our case the frame was factory-build and assembled on site by the erection crew. Some companies like Huf haus go the whole hog and fully make up the panels including doors, windows interval finish, etc. bypassing all of this fit-out complexity but the end cost is a lot higher. We went for the cheapest way of realising the house that we wanted.

#30 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 10:15 AM

View PostJanetE, on 27 April 2016 - 07:40 AM, said:

We haven't got as far as preparing for plastering yet, if you have a picture it would be good to see it. Thanks :)

I used a bead to try and get a shadow gap, was meant to be reversible so it could be used with either wet plaster or drylining.

http://www.247tradec...&product_id=184

I was going with no wet plaster and wish now I had of. The dryliners hated using it, the carpenters didn't like doing things out of order, and the decorators cursed the dryliners.

I was trying to make the shadow gap by combining the edging on the link with a skirting and architrave with the following profile.

http://www.skirtech....oduct--377.html

With the plan that the face of the skirting an the face of the plasterboard would be on the same plane, and the step woould creat the shadow gap. It didn't work as I hoped, the metal "turn up" around the plasterboard is still visible and the dryliner made a right hash of cutting them (looked like he used a hammer in some places).

So make sure you don't do it the way I have done and make sure everyone is on board with what you are doing and the look you are trying to achieve. I think is it much easier if you have a wet plaster, wishing I had done that now.

Can post some pictures later if you want to see how not to do it

#31 TerryE

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 10:54 AM

Dave, we've talked about coming to visit you guys. Maybe it's time for that visit. :) Pictures would be good, both for us and anyone else interested in this thread.

Edited by TerryE, 27 April 2016 - 10:54 AM.


#32 Calvinmiddle

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 11:07 AM

Terry - will send you a PM with dates that would be good

Edited by Calvinmiddle, 27 April 2016 - 11:08 AM.


#33 Trw144

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 11:35 AM

Ditto on pictures - we are thinking of shadow gap and no skirting, possibly also around the door frames. Any help on exactly how (or how not) to achieve this would be great - and pictures say a thousand words.

For the floor/wall shadow gap, my tiler suggested it was best to dryline, lay the tiles, and then using a laser level for accuracy, cut the plasterboard to allow for the shadow gap profile to be added, and then get it skimmed after.

#34 AlexC

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Posted 27 April 2016 - 12:22 PM

A floor wall shadow gap with no flush skirting is going to constantly get damaged and marked. This link http://armourcoat.co...dsubstrates.pdf
has all the details and profiles you will need, just use plaster skim instead of armourcoat. Metal trims are better than plastic but also more expensive. Around the door you will need your joiner to very accurately fit the lining as the edge of it stays exposed. You may also want a slightly thicker lining or use a split rebated lining with the stop bead covering the joint in the middle, this is fairly standard on accoustic doors such as those used in hotels.

#35 Woodgnome

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 01:09 AM

Pics...used the trims in the link on last post. The liner's are rebated and the trim slots into the rebate ( engaging) as opposed to butting up to the liner ( abutting).
Expamet do a galv bead but the one I used is PPC.

Attached Files



#36 HerbJ

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 03:25 PM

View PostAlexC, on 27 April 2016 - 12:22 PM, said:

A floor wall shadow gap with no flush skirting is going to constantly get damaged and marked. This link http://armourcoat.co...dsubstrates.pdf
has all the details and profiles you will need, just use plaster skim instead of armourcoat. Metal trims are better than plastic but also more expensive. Around the door you will need your joiner to very accurately fit the lining as the edge of it stays exposed. You may also want a slightly thicker lining or use a split rebated lining with the stop bead covering the joint in the middle, this is fairly standard on accoustic doors such as those used in hotels.

The QICTrim profiles, referenced in the Armourcoat attachment provided above, are available from Travis Perkins by special order ( 2 to 3 days lead time). The QICTRim Catalogue is attached

Attached Files



#37 Woodgnome

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 03:41 PM

Condells do the trims as well...

I'll also say they were a PITA to do as well!

Edited by Woodgnome, 30 April 2016 - 04:15 PM.