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16Th Century Grade Ii List Property Repairs


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#1 Larli

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 10:44 AM

Hi

I am hoping someone can help provide some recommendations. I am about to start doing some building work and repairs on my 16th Century Grade II listed property (timber frame with painted brick infil).

I would welcome some recommendations for good builders, architects and surveyors who have proven experience in period properties in the home counties area.

In particular the builder needs to be sympathetic to old buildings and understand them.

Any help would much appreciated

Thanks

Edited by joiner, 28 June 2013 - 07:21 PM.
Typo


#2 joiner

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 04:47 PM

Start with your CO and/or go knocking on the doors of owners of other Listed buidings for referrals to any tradesmen they've used.

At one time, some LA Conservation (now Heritage) departments kept lists of tradesmen they knew to be reliable in terms of methods and materials, but the trend nowadays is to the vastly INFERIOR lists of 'approved' trades in schemes run by some Trading Standards departments, which aren't the same sort of lists at all.

The former you were invited onto, the latter you can get onto by simply signing up to a Code of Practice.

#3 PeakOakFrames

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:08 PM

I can highly recommend Timber Framing and Conservation - www.timberframing.org.uk Based in the East Midlands but work nationally. Ed, James and Tom are all SPAB Fellows and recipients of the William Morris Craft Fellowship. On top of that thoroughly nice blokes who love historic buildings. Your best bet is to phone Ed as he is not a fan of technology.

Edited by PeakOakFrames, 28 June 2013 - 06:09 PM.


#4 temp

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 07:47 AM

You may find the conservation officer reluctant to recommend someone for fear they would be liable if it went pear shaped. Our planning and building Control officers wouldn't recommend a builder at first so I said... "I know you can't recommend a builder, but have you seen any nice houses/projects I should go take a look at". They were more than happy to take the hint and I was steered to a few fantastic houses and barn conversions. They are more likely to do this at a face to face meeting than put it in writing.

#5 joiner

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 09:06 AM

COs will still often refer you to other people who have had work done, even if they won't refer you directly to a tradesman.

The list I referred to was claimed "not to exist" when I first heard of it. When I was phoned and asked if I'd "mind being added to our list of preferred tradesmen" I asked if that was the list that didn't exist!

Subsequent COs were quite open about the list because it often proved very difficult to get enough quotes to meet the requirement for grants: two for <£5,000, three for >£5,000, so customers needed names to contact. All academic now since historic building grants have all but disappeared. :(

#6 Larli

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 07:21 AM

Thank you everyone for your help and suggestions, will look into builders via the routes you have reccomended, but if anyone has some actual names to help speed up my "homework" - keep thm coming.

Thanks again